Changes – and a Great Partnership! (STS Moving to Script Revolution!)

Hard to believe, but it’s now been over three years since Shootin’ the Shorts opened shop here on WordPress. And we’ve had one heck of a rollercoaster ride ever since.

So many shorts produced, so much networking between writers, directors and film buffs.

And we ain’t even CLOSE to done.  

As they say so eloquently in the classic comedy Galaxy Quest:
Never Give Up, Never Surrender!

And STS isn’t giving up.  We’re evolving.

As many readers already know, STS has partnered for awhile with the terrific and ever growing site,

Script Revolution: http://www.scriptrevolution.com

And now, it’s time to roll STS completely into the Script Revolution fold.

For that reason, this particular page and all the reviews will remain live, and are worth continuing to search for gems – but you won’t be seeing any new reviews over here.  But tons ‘o them over at Script Rev.

And all you have to do to keep up on the latest is mosey on over to that URL (again, that’s www.scriptrevolution.com), and sign up for a free membership.  It’ll be easy to find the neon signs pointing to STS… plus much more.

Trust us – it’s very much worth it.  The art of screenwriting and movie making always is.

***

As a reminder: back on March 15th, Dropbox finally discontinued the use of the old “public folder” link process.  As a result, there will be some links to reviewed scripts here that are no longer active.  But that does not mean they’re necessarily off the market.

If a review/showcase has you itching to read a script that’s no longer linked, just check out the “about the writer” section of the review and email them directly.  We’re confident you’ll be glad you did – and that they’ll be glad to hear from you!

So Long and Thanks for All the Fish… and see you ASAP at Script Rev!!

 

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Family Man – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Family Man

Before a member of a mob family can be named the new Capo, he has to take care of an unpleasant task to prove his loyalty to the family.

Mob movies are an interesting subculture… one which has spawned some – well, really seriously good sh*t.   Seriously: The GodfatherScarfacePulp Fiction. Reservoir DogsThe Sopranos.  The list goes on.  When done right, the genre seems to create some of the best quotes in film history, and some of the most memorable characters.  But since it’s been done so many times, how can a mob script find fresh material?

Family Man manages to pull it off.  Starting in familiar territory, FM fades in on Johnny Parisi, a loyal mob soldier that’s been handpicked as the new Capo.  You see, Frankie – the older Capo – doublecrossed the boss. As a result, they’re still scraping Frankie (and his dog) off his lawn. The thing is – Boss Lombardo doesn’t want a repeat performance.  So he’s testing Johnny first.  Before he gets his promotion, Johnny’ll have to take care of Frankie’s accomplice.  But when Parisi finds out who that is, all his plans go to hell.  Who’s the rat? And will Johnny pull the trigger? Or end up on the wrong end of Lombardo’s wrath?

If you wanna find out, you’re gonna have to open this script yourself. ‘Cause I ain’t gonna be the one to spill the beans…

About the writer: Gary Howell is an attorney who has been writing as a hobby for years, and his short “The Family Man,” led to a connection with an Australian film director. The two collaborated on a feature film, “Broad Daylight,” which is currently in pre-production, with filming to begin in New Orleans in July. He is currently working on two new features.

Pages: 10

Budget: Moderate.  This isn’t a Tarantino script – you won’t blow your budget on squibs.  But there are a moderate number of locations (both exterior and interior) and a healthy number of characters.  But the settings are pretty flexible; this could be shot most anywhere.

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Cooked – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Cooked

A this-or-that of urban legends as an old cat lady goes about her day. …

There’s something about mixing horror and comedy that just works so well.  You know, like Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups – mix chocolate and peanut butter (or is that peanut butter and chocolate?), and the result is better than any single ingredient.  Doubt me on that?  Try some of these titles on for size: Army of Darkness, Shaun of the Dead,  American Werewolf in London (in parts.).  ‘Nuff said.  Game, set and match.

Following in that noble of tradition of laughing at potentially grisly events, Cooked follows the story of little old lady Barbara, as she pulls into her driveway.  Her son Jacob has lent her the family cat for a day of fur-baby sitting – and Barbara’s thrilled.  But, as old people sometimes are (especially in films), Barbara can be a bit… absentminded.  As the script progresses, the feline dangers in house begin to mount.  An open microwave.  Upended knives in the sink.  Will Barbara be a good grand-mamma to little pussy?  Or is there a cat-astrophe in their future?

Give Cooked a read.  It’s a fun little script with a strong ending.  And hey…  any script that endangers a cat is fine with me.

About the writer: Chris Shamburger was a semi-finalist in the 2011 Shriekfest Film Festival and finalist (Top 10) in 2013 for his recently-produced script, Hiccups. He was a semi-finalist in the 2008 Straight Twisted Horror Screenplay Contest and has been published in Twisted Dreams Magazine and Horror in Words. He lives in Marietta, GA with his partner and their Chow-mix rescue, Walter. Aside from writing, Chris has been teaching pre-kindergarten for the past five years.

Pages: 4

Budget: Low budget ; the entire script takes place at a single house (interior and exterior shots.)  One character.  Two, if you count the cat.  Which  is probably the only tricky part.  But that’s what stuffed props are for!! Or housecats you no longer need…

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

The End in Sight – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

The End in Sight

A hired killer tries to finish one last job before going blind.

A bad guy with a soft spot – looking to do something right after a lifetime of mistakes…  What the heck is it about characters like this that captures the imagination?  Because they do. Every time.  They’re just so… more interesting than vanilla good guys. Screw Mark Hamill.  I’ll take Han Solo any day.  (And admit it…you would too.)  Hit men especially.  Watch the Professional or In Bruges, and dare to disagree.

The End in Sight is a short script that “hits” that exact note perfectly.  Enter Hugo – the consummate hit man.  He’s killed efficiently all his life. Now – unfortunately – he’s going blind.  Which, one could imagine, is really bad ju-ju for a man who relies on visual acuity…

Hugo’s trying to finish one last job before he retires: kill a gangster, and return a wayward prostitute, Winter, to a rival pimp named Skarda.  Needless to say – things get emotionally complicated and go horribly wrong.  Given the setup, this could have been a cliche script.  But The End in Sight does things right; pulling out twists and character beats that make the whole trip worthwhile. So if crime and thrillers are your forte, crack this one open. It’s got a killer ending…

About the writer: Breanne Mattson is no stranger to accolades.  Her feature lengths have made Nicholl Quarterfinalist three times (yeah, that’s three times, beeyotch!) She’s also made semi-finalist in Bluecat, Final Draft and honorable mention in TrackingB.  She’s also received a “worth the read” from Scriptshadow.  Her website can be viewed at www.breannemattson.com (IMDB credits here.)

Pages: 35

Budget: Okay. This one’s no “newbie” script.  Thirty five pages long, it features plenty o’ squibs and bullet hits,  stunt car driving, and both inside and outside locations.  But in experienced hands, this script could be amazing.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Dropbox Links n’ Stuff (But Never Fear!)

Here ye, here ye!

Thanks to an overdue change in Dropbox (the phase-out of the old “public folder” system), please be aware some of STS’s reviewed scripts will no longer be available via the link at the bottom of some of our older posts.

But that doesn’t at all mean the scripts are no longer available, folks!

For those scripts this affects, please head on over to the “About the Writer” section of the reviews you find yourself intrigued by, and contact the writer by email instead.

Trust us, it’s worth it.  Because when faced with technological obstacles such as this, it’s the director who takes the initiative who wins the script – and the prize!!

Baby Steps – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Baby Steps

You never forget the first time you fall in love – even if you were in diapers.

Okay, we’ll admit that talking baby scripts aren’t always the best thing since sliced bread.  Case in point: the Look Who’s Talking Series, from One through…well, whenever they decided to finally stop torturing the movie going public.  Honestly – after the first fifteen rounds, baby poop jokes get kinda…stale.  To put it mildly.  (Even if poop itself continues to be funny to those of us with a case of arrested development.)

But occasionally, a script comes along that proves the exception to the rule.  A script with a gentle sense of humor, and heart.  Baby Steps is that exception.

This short follows the story of Millie and Hank – two babies that meet cute one day in the park; only to have their chance encounter and hopes dashed to smithereens when their mothers roll them away.  Their baby hearts are broken – never to meet again.  Or will they?  (Cue the dramatic music here.)

Folks, this one’s an honestly cute and intelligent romance.  Not to mention an easy shoot – baby wrangling and spit-up aside.  Give this short a shot… and make your audience feel young at heart.

About the writer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus.  Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced.   Dave would like to make it three.  He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com.  Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie.

Pages: 9

Budget: Very low.  Well, with the exception of dealing with baby actors.  Unless your friends have a few that can be borrowed…

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Trick of the Trade – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Trick of the Trade

When young Harry needs money to buy a gift, he learns that crime does pay, but in an unexpected way.

There’s something about scripts involving school boy crushes, and first loves.  Then again – who doesn’t like stories about disreputable (yet somehow charming) con men?  If you nodded to both of those statements, then Trick of the Trade is right for you.  Because this is a script that actually incorporates both of these elements into one package.

Little Harry Cartwright is a simple rural kid, growing up in Depression era Oklahoma.  The light of his life is Susie Clemons, a pretty little school girl and Harry’s first love.  Unfortunately for both, Susie’s family is moving to Texas. In just two weeks. A crestfallen Harry’s committed to getting her a school photo of himself as a keepsake.  Problem is, it costs a quarter.  And that’s way too expensive for him.

After his request is rebuffed by his father, Harry sets off to the local Pharmacy to see if he can steal the dough.  He’s stopped by Roscoe – a local con man and n’er do well – who tells him to leave the stealin’ to more capable folk.  Undeterred, Harry glues himself to Roscoe, determined to earn his pay… in addition to that damned quarter.

The result?  A combination of Ocean’s Eleven meets Mark Twain.  It’s a satisfying story with a lot of character… perfect for a director looking to prove their storytelling chops.

About the writer: Gary Howell is an attorney who has been writing as a hobby for years, and his short “The Family Man,” led to a connection with an Australian film director. The two collaborated on a feature film, “Broad Daylight,” which is currently in pre-production, with filming to begin in New Orleans in July. He is currently working on two new features.

Pages: 18

Budget: Moderate to Average.  Trick of the Trade is a period piece.  And there are a variety of locations, and characters. Despite that, there’s not much needed in the way of FX – this script is far more character/actor focused than anything else.

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.