Dixie Gash Bandits – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

“Dixie Gash Bandits”

When they stop to fix their get-a-way vehicle, two runaway sisters must tackle both love at first sight and the bounty hunters hot on their tail.

I believe Mr. Torrance said it best when he tapped: “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” Pulling for good to triumph over evil is human nature. Rooting for and wanting to be the bad guys once in awhile – it’s just fun. Especially when they’re on the run.

Butch and Sundance riding from state to state. Bonnie and Clyde driving from bank to bank. Thelma and Louise flying in their T-Bird to a better life. We all have an inner want to be the one pushing the pedal to the floor, thumbing authority as we streak down the highway.

In the opening scene of CJ Walley’s “Dixie Gash Bandits,” a Mustang blazes down said highway through the night and we know we’re in for a helluva ride. The car is being pushed to the limit by Savannah, whose sister Ginger implores her to ease up on the gas and give their stallion a break. No way Savannah’s giving in. And no way these women are going back or stopping for whatever’s chasing.

The stage is set for the entire story in less than half a page. Brilliant.

GINGER

You’re pushin’ too hard.

SAVANNAH

Baby, you run fast enough for long

enough, people have to stop chasin’.

GINGER

Yeah, and if you run too fast or push too hard,

you crash and burn. You’re burnin’ us up.

They’re running on empty and troubles a comin’. Savannah spots a lonely and much-needed gas station “with small store and a rusting hut workshop” and pulls the tired ‘Stang into its lot. Is this gas station an oasis or their final resting place? Or neither?

A mechanic, Bobby, saunters out. He stares a little too long at Savannah. Instant connection.

BOBBY

What can I do you for?

 The Mustang hisses, steam erupts, a definite foreshadowing of the steam to come after Savannah admits “we got cash flow problems.” Soon after, she and Bobby crash as one into the workshop, kissing, groping and unbuttoning.

Not too far off in the horizon, relentless and ruthless bounty hunters Colt (what an awesome name for a “suited and booted” good old boy) and Jessie are hot on the sisters’ trail, questioning a man about Savannah and Ginger’s whereabouts when…BANG! Question time is over. Man slumps.

COLT

Now that was an overreaction.

JESSIE

No, that was a waste of time. Now

what? I’m getting impatient.

 You won’t lose patience racing through the rest of this tightly-woven tale as Jessie and Colt catch up to the runaways at their gas station. The story ends with multiple bangs as all five characters find themselves in a bloody shootout leaving just two survivors.

Do Savannah and Ginger go down in a blaze of glory a la Butch and Sundance? Do they go out on their own terms like Thelma and Louise? Or, do they write their own classic ending? I’m guessing you know which and you also know this superbly-written story will find a director faster then you can type “All work and no play….”

Pages: 8

Budget: Find a kick-ass Mustang and a rusty old gas station and call ‘er a day, partner.

About the reviewer: Zack Zupke is a writer in Los Angeles. Zack was a latch-key kid (insert “awww” here) whose best friend was a 19-inch color television (horrific, he knows). His early education (1st grade on) included watching countless hours of shows like “M*A*S*H,” “Star Trek” and “The Odd Couple” and movies like “The Godfather,” “Rocky” and “Annie Hall.” Flash forward to present day and his short “The Confession” was recently produced by Trident Technical College in Charleston, SC. He’s currently working on a futuristic hitman thriller with a partner and refining a dramedy pilot perfect for the likes of FX. You can reach Zack at zzupke “at” yahoo.

About the writer, C.J. Walley: I began writing in 2012 and I’m pleased to say it’s been very exciting so far. I have been fortunate enough to have a short produced by a director in London and Amazon Studios have spotlighted one of my features as a notable project. My scripts place within the top 10% of various major screenwriting competitions and, as I continue to write new specs, I am remotely collaborating with a producers, directors, and actors in LA, NYC, New Orleans, Atlanta, Washington DC, Zurich, Amsterdam, Sydney, and Dallas while occasionally blogging for Stage 32.  If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, then I’d love to join forces with you whatever the scale, do not hesitate to reach out and drop me a line. (CJ “AT” CJwalley DOT COM; http://www.cjwalley.com

 READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

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All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

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So Cal Gun Girls – Short Script Review

So Cal Gun Girls

After buying drugs and debating the commercialization of cannabis in California, two female gang members stumble straight into a robber who’s killed their beloved dealer.

Remember when Tarantino first exploded on the scene?  No, we don’t mean Inglourious Basterds, or Django, either. No, we’re talkin’ real classics: Pulp Fiction level quality. Quirky dialog that blew your mind.  Gritty characters that popped right off the screen.  Cinematic mainline stuff that left you begging for more.

Well, imagine fresh and shiny QT content – with a 180 gender twist.  Characters like Sam Jackson and Travolta – but packin’ tampons along with 45s.  That’s So Cal Gun Girls in a nutshell.  And it’s a bundle of criminal fun.

Meet Maddy and Lila – two mid-level grass dealers in CA.  For years, their distributor’s been the singular Suzanne Wu (her stoic father rolling joints by her side.)  The girls make a living – such as it is – but recently Maddy’s been dreaming of something… more.  Especially with legalization encroaching on their territory. Can they really compete with Walmart? Or is it time to expand a bit? Madam Wu’s pushing the latest and greatest product – meth (though not Walter White trademark blue.)  The girls refuse the offer, and head outside to debate microeconomics… and their next business steps.

But things are about to get complicated. Because a hostile takeover’s in the works.  One that’ll affect the girl’s market. And perhaps their lives.

Yep, it’s Reservoir Dogs meets Bridesmaids (or The Heat, if you’re so inclined.) But whatever you call it, So Cal Gun Girls is real good sh*t (and potentially expandable to feature length).  Perfect for directors with a criminal mind.

About the writer, C.J. Walley: I began writing in 2012 and I’m pleased to say it’s been very exciting so far. I have been fortunate enough to have a short produced by a director in London and Amazon Studios have spotlighted one of my features as a notable project. My scripts place within the top 10% of various major screenwriting competitions and, as I continue to write specs, I am remotely collaborating with a producer in LA on a comedy series, working with a director in New Orleans on a thriller, and blogging for Stage 32. I’m here to do two things, work hard and make friends. My writing has a down and dirty tone, deep emotion, gritty action, wry humor, and features strong female leads. If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, then I’d love to join forces with you whatever the scale, do not hesitate to reach out and drop me a line. (CJ “AT” CJwalley DOT COM; http://www.cjwalley.com)

Pages: 8

Budget: Mid range.  You want great actresses, of course.  And awesome cinematography wouldn’t hurt, either.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Whiteout on Route 89 – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

Whiteout On Route 89
A blizzard on Route 89 has dire consequences for a woman on the eve of her wedding day, and the taxi driver who gets her to confess all.

There’s something about the quiet cold of a frozen winter night in the middle of nowhere. It elicits a certain instant honesty for no other reason than the human body cannot lie when it’s fighting for survival.

Its vulnerabilities become unmistakably apparent as it shakes to stay alive, exposing its very soul with every plume of exhaled breath, leaving a trail with every step.

It cannot hide.

A young woman in “Whiteout On Route 89” tries to hide in the back of a long, snowy cab ride in the middle of nowhere. But, taxi drivers are part barkeep, part psychologist. They’ve seen it all, heard even more and have driven down every road. Especially Edie’s 60-something driver Reg, who politely grills her as holiday music cheerfully emits from his CD player.

REG
So, mind if I ask what you’re doing all the way out here?
I mean it’s beautiful and all but this time of year…
I hope you got a proper place to hole up cause —

EDIE
Me and my fiance got a cabin down by the lake. We’re getting married Christmas Eve,
he’s staying in town with the boys while me and some of the girls…

Her words trail off.

And Reg is on the trail of something he knows to be deeper than the snowdrifts building all around them. Perhaps that’s what drove the deer onto the road in front of them.

The violent impact propels the animal onto the bonnet. Reg pulls the car hard the other way again to right it. The out of control vehicle smacks into a guard rail, becomes airborne, careens over a bank, slides into a ravine. The sickening crunch of metal and glass as it slams sideways into a felled log, then comes to a stop. The deer slides off the bonnet onto the ground. Steam billows from the car bonnet. It spurts, hisses, then extinguishes.

The only thing more honest than winter is death. And the occupants of THIS taxi can smell a healthy dose of each in the air as they continue to unravel Edie’s real origin. And Reg’s destination, as well.

“Whiteout On Route 89” is a brittle and suspenseful ride, filled with sharp and brutally-honest dialogue. It’s reminiscent of the Coen brothers’ “Fargo” with it’s subtle textures and permeating use of nature as a central character. And, the ending would surely leave Marge Gunderson shaking her head.

This tale would make an incredible short for a brave cast and crew, who will surely have to battle winter to tell it right.

But, honestly, there’s no other way.

Pages: 17

Budget: Moderate. With a bit of nuance, all that’s really needed are two excellent actors, and a beaten up car with character…

About the Reviewer: Zack Zupke is a writer in Los Angeles. Zack was a latch-key kid (insert “awww” here) whose best friend was a 19-inch color television (horrific, he knows). His early education (1st grade on) included watching countless hours of shows like “M*A*S*H,” “Star Trek” and “The Odd Couple” and movies like “The Godfather,” “Rocky” and “Annie Hall.” Flash forward to present day and his short “The Confession” was recently produced by Trident Technical College in Charleston, SC. He’s currently working on a futuristic hitman thriller with a partner and refining a dramedy pilot perfect for the likes of FX. You can reach Zack at zzupke “at” yahoo.

About the Writer: Libby Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She has also worked professionally as a freelance web-content editor and proofreader. She is thrilled her first ever entry (Simpatico) into a Screenplay Comp – The LA Comedy Festival ‘Short’ screenplay division took out Top 3 Finalist and hopes the high placing will be a continuing trend. Libby would love to see her words come to life on screen. She lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia, and describes him as being both a good and a bad influence on her writing. You can contact Libby at libbych “AT” hotmail.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

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All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Thicker Than Water – Short Script Review (Optioned!)

Thicker Than Water

“A successful drug dealer gets the shock of her life when her estranged younger sister shows up.”

Anyone who’s got a sister or brother knows it’s a given — an unwritten rule that you love them. Or at least you like them. A little bit. That’s how it’s supposed to be anyway… Interactions with siblings can be complicated. More likely than not, your mutual feelings probably run the gamut on a daily basis – somewhere between undying love and hate. (Don’t worry… we won’t tell your sister.)

But in MJ Hermanny’s award-winning drama Thicker Than Water, there’s more at stake than a few conflicted feelings.

It’s after midnight when the buzzer sounds at Trina’s plush London penthouse, and she’s stunned to hear Cassie’s voice, her younger sister. Trina hesitates at first; she and Cassie have been estranged for six years. Besides, Trina’s busy… counting the money from her drug business. But she hides the loot and lets Cassie in.

You can cut the tension with a knife as the two struggle to find common ground. Trina’s fancy surroundings are no longer a lure for Cassie. She’s been there, done that – and gotten out. And she wants the same for Trina. Well, actually, she demands it. Using her Metropolitan Police badge as leverage.

Trina challenges Cassie, “You wouldn’t bust your own sister!” The unwritten rule hangs thick in the air. Sisters are supposed to have each other’s back. Aren’t they?

Will Cassie succeed in changing Trina’s path? Or are these sisters heading for a showdown that makes sibling rivalry look like child’s play?

Similar to movies like August: Osage County, Rachel Getting Married and In Her Shoes, the relationship in TTW is intensely relatable. Simple to film, TTW delivers a compelling story with two strong female characters. So grab this one now — it won’t last long!

About the writer: Boasting an MA in Scriptwriting for Film, Theatre, TV & Radio, MJ is an award winning writer, with shorts optioned and produced in countries as diverse as Croatia and Norway. Residing in sunny England, she is currently hard at work developing a series with the BBC Writersroom – as well as working on a number of features (including one low-budget horror and a fantasy adventure script.) Her website is available here: redcatwriter.wordpress.com/. MJ herself can be reached via mjhermanny – AT – gmail!

Pages: 4

Budget: Low. Only two characters and one room. This story’s an easy shoot – with an up close and personal feel.

About the reviewer for “Thicker Than Water”: California uber reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

The Painful Side of the Pillow – Short Script Review (Optioned!)

The Painful Side of the Pillow

Pillow Girl is determined to fight to create a better society. But, evil is lurking in some very unexpected places…

Who has never experienced a desire for superpowers to miraculously make the worst of their troubles merely disappear? Most comic strip and film superheroes fall into “superherohood” because of some unplanned event-such as being born with superpowers, drinking some potion, or suffering an accident- that permanently alters their physical constitution and consequently limits their ability to pursue other less noble career goals. Sometimes reluctantly, other times enthusiastically, they choose to pursue their calling and bravely set out to eradicate evil.

For Tabitha, the protagonist in Jason K. Allen’s latest work, The Painful Side of the Pillow, becoming a superhero is a conscious decision. From a young age, she knows that she would like to deploy her budding pillow-fighting abilities “… to make a positive impact on society.” She determinedly develops her skills to become the superhero she always wanted to be …Pillow Girl.

In the tradition of superheroes like the Electric Company’s Letterman, Pillow Girl is a gentle superhero. She doesn’t kill off villains or save the world from total destruction. She simply encourages people to do the right thing. And, she achieves that with a superpower that is comic. Viewers will love the campy humor as Pillow Girl thwarts everyday minor transgressions to the raving praises of the witnesses to her noble deeds.

There is so much fun in this piece that viewers will be surprised when the story twists to reveal a dark side to Pillow Girl’s trajectory of which even she was unaware, along with an enemy she had no idea existed. The Painful Side of the Pillow proves both entertaining and extremely provocative as it probes common understandings about heroes and villains, strength and weakness, and good and evil. You won’t rest until you see this one!

Pages: 6

Budget: Low to moderate.

About the writer: Jason K. Allen is a writer and filmmaker from Nashville, Tennessee. His produced short scripts include AMERICAN SOCK, which won Best Screenplay at the 2014 San Diego Film Awards, and AUTUMN LOVERS, winner of the Audience Award at the 2013 Artlightenment Festival in Nashville. He also wrote the feature film LUCKY FRITZ starring Julia Dietze (IRON SKY) and Corey Feldman. Jason is also a wilderness guide, nature photographer, and published author. See IMDB for his complete credits: www.imdb.com/name/nm3021924

About the Reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She has always loved to write, but only recently has begun to work on screenplays. She can be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.