Cooked – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Cooked

A this-or-that of urban legends as an old cat lady goes about her day. …

There’s something about mixing horror and comedy that just works so well.  You know, like Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups – mix chocolate and peanut butter (or is that peanut butter and chocolate?), and the result is better than any single ingredient.  Doubt me on that?  Try some of these titles on for size: Army of Darkness, Shaun of the Dead,  American Werewolf in London (in parts.).  ‘Nuff said.  Game, set and match.

Following in that noble of tradition of laughing at potentially grisly events, Cooked follows the story of little old lady Barbara, as she pulls into her driveway.  Her son Jacob has lent her the family cat for a day of fur-baby sitting – and Barbara’s thrilled.  But, as old people sometimes are (especially in films), Barbara can be a bit… absentminded.  As the script progresses, the feline dangers in house begin to mount.  An open microwave.  Upended knives in the sink.  Will Barbara be a good grand-mamma to little pussy?  Or is there a cat-astrophe in their future?

Give Cooked a read.  It’s a fun little script with a strong ending.  And hey…  any script that endangers a cat is fine with me.

About the writer: Chris Shamburger was a semi-finalist in the 2011 Shriekfest Film Festival and finalist (Top 10) in 2013 for his recently-produced script, Hiccups. He was a semi-finalist in the 2008 Straight Twisted Horror Screenplay Contest and has been published in Twisted Dreams Magazine and Horror in Words. He lives in Marietta, GA with his partner and their Chow-mix rescue, Walter. Aside from writing, Chris has been teaching pre-kindergarten for the past five years.

Pages: 4

Budget: Low budget ; the entire script takes place at a single house (interior and exterior shots.)  One character.  Two, if you count the cat.  Which  is probably the only tricky part.  But that’s what stuffed props are for!! Or housecats you no longer need…

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

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Give Me a Break – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

GIVE ME A BREAK

Ten year old Michael comes up with an idea to get his bike back from the thieving hands of Wes; the neighborhood bully.

Whatever happens to good old short stories (or scripts) that gave the reader/viewer a fun n’ quirky slice of life? They seem to be in short supply these days: bumped to the side in favor of vampire and zombie flicks… and comedies that focus on wacky scenarios and bawdy sex antics. (Not that there’s anything wrong with those, mind you.)

Well, here’s a blast from the past.  A fun, straightforward story of a few innocent kids picked on by the neighborhood bully… and the ten year old who hatches a plan to stop the lunk in his tracks.  The script’s simple, fun and short – with a neat twist. Give this one a read, and consider it for your next project. It’s sure to leave you with happy viewers, who will remember this short long after the credits roll.

About the writer: Matthew Dressel recently wrote/produced/acted in his own web series Let’s Kill John Stamos! One of his feature films, Killing Daniel, has been optioned by Darius Films. You can catch more of Matt’s work at www.matthewdressel.com.

Pages: 7

Budget: Pretty micro.  All that’s needed are a few child actors (though we all know how difficult they can be!)

WANT TO READ THE SCRIPT?  CONTACT MATT AT WWW.MATTHEWDRESSEL.COM!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Freak – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Freak

A simple wave and smile alters the life of a teenager.

High school trauma. The popular kids. The outcasts. The bullies. It’s a theme that’s been deeply explored in movies. The Breakfast Club’s an outstanding example, of course. But the cinematic list goes on and on. Which is only natural. Because finding one’s place in life and surviving the horrors of one’s teens? That’s a human, universal truth. In any generation you care to name.

Take Frank Reak for example (F.Reak, for those slow on the uptake.). Goth. And seventeen. A perfect target for bullying. As the script opens, poor Frank’s taking a toilet face bath in the men’s bathroom – courtesy of one of the all-stars of the football team.

The jock calls him a freak, and walks away. Leaving Frank simmering.

Later in the day, their paths cross again. This time, Mr. Jock’s on the field – celebrating his latest victory. And Frank’s in the stands with the rest of the geeks of the school band. Playing guitar on the sidelines.

And hiding a gun in the amplifier.

Will this end in tragedy? Another school shooting – more victims? Or does fate have something more in mind. For Frank. And his future…?

A micro short, Freak packs a lot of emotion into a single page. Perfect for a director on a mini-budget. But looking for maximum impact.

About the writer: Rick Hansberry has written/produced several short films, including the SAG Foundation award-winning “Branches.” He teaches screenwriting seminars and workshops in the Central Pennsylvania area and is presently available for hire for new story ideas, rewrites and adaptations. He can be reached at djrickhansberry – AT – msn, (cell phone 717-682-8618) and IMDB credits available here.

Pages: 1

Budget: Pretty minor. Two settings. A number of extras for the football game.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

A Kindness – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

A Kindness
Sometimes, it’s Cruel to Be Kind. In the RIGHT measure…

One page.

One location: the death chamber/a prison cell.

Two people: a doctor, and a desperate patient.

One dilemma: the patient wants to die. The doctor doesn’t quite know why.

DOCTOR: How is death a kindness?

Sure, the Chinese conquest is audible outside – but who wishes for death because of that?

It’s not just that. There’s one more reason. A reason far less noble than avoiding capture. A reason the doctor understands… deep down.

And it’s reason that may factor into his decision… even with soldiers pounding on their door.

What’s that reason? Will the needle find his patient’s arm? Take a minute out of your day to read A Kindness and find out!

And grab it for option before the opportunity (and life) slips away.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: The co-writer of the acclaimed graphic novel Chasing the Dead, Tim Westland received first place for Balls Out in the NNYM 15 page contest. An outstanding writer with an eye for the details, his IMDB page can be found here.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

The Majors – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

The Majors

A father’s promise echoes into eternity, as “a son never forgets.”

Sometimes, less is more. When written properly, one page can be more evocative than reams of prose. Why write something feature length when a few well crafted lines will do?

Such is the case with The Majors – a short that tugs at the heartstrings.

Basically one page long, the script has just two speaking characters. Dad and Son… written in voiceover. Dad’s teaching his youngster to play baseball. But the kid’s reluctant. What’ll his friends think if he sucks? But Dad’s insistent, and offers his son a reward for every ball he hits.

As their negotiation continues, a Major League game plays out on-screen. There’s a new batter at the plate. And a certain fan in the seats…

Though micro-short, The Majors hits with power. Short, sweet and to the point. Perfect for any indie drama director that wants a script with class and style.

About the writer, Rod Thompson: Rod Thompson is an award winning screenwriter of both features and shorts. His feature, “The Squire” won Best Drama for the 2014 Table Read My Screenplay contest, and he has placed numerous times for his shorts at MoviePoet.com. His short scripts “Gimme Shelter” and “A Memory in Winter” have both been optioned through their exposure on SimplyScripts.com’s “Shootin’ The Shorts.” He is also “the most humble man alive.”

Pages: 1

Budget: None.  Some stock photography – two great voice characters, access to baseball stands… and you’re done.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

The End of the Affair – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

The End of the Affair
Everyone’s replaceable. Aren’t they?

It’s true, breaking up is hard to do.

Sometimes, it feels like the end of everything. As if your beloved were the only thing keeping the entire world safe.

And then there’s the inescapable guilt. Was I to blame? Or were they?

In Tim Westland’s micro-short End of the Affair, an old woman runs after a much younger man down 5th Avenue in NYC – accusing him of betraying his promise to “always be there”.

Deep down, the man knows he IS at fault. When pushed for answers, he admits he wasn’t what she was looking for. What humanity was looking for, either.

Because he’s not just breaking up with a person. He’s breaking up with a planet, too.

Who is he? He’s Mr. Readthescripttofindout!
‘Cause this twist’s out of this world!

Pages: 2

Budget: Very minor. All you need is an urban setting, and a few well cast actors.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the Writer, Tim Westland: Co-writer of the acclaimed graphic novel Chasing the Dead, Tim’s an outstanding writer with an eye for the detail. When not subsumed in writing throes, he can be reached timwestland “AT” hotmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

The Diner – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

The Diner
Memories Matter. As do the bonds of love…

“Age is but a number”.

Banal as this saying may be, it’s true in many ways. No matter one’s age, human norms like memories and romance never fade… until the very end.

David M. Troop’s short The Diner offers heart-warming proof of this, as we bear witness to the wedding anniversary of two 75-year-olds, Ellen and Joseph.

They must’ve had a myriad of memorable moments together. But tonight, their celebration location is a humble diner, easily dismissed by anyone.

But to our geriatric duo, it’s unforgettable. Because this is where, over half a century ago, their love began to blossom.

And it also creates Ellie’s anniversary present to Joseph: a chance to remember where it all began before age distorts and deletes reality.

And Joseph uses the opportunity given to him wisely: he doesn’t just remind himself of their decades-old beginnings, he recreates them with Ellen, his life-long love.

Perfectly. Resulting in some odd looks from the diner staff. But there won’t be any odd looks from any audience to this microbudget movie – just praise.

Because like the diner Ellen and Joseph visit, The Diner is simple, yet nostalgically beautiful.

And truly impossible to forget.

Pages: 5

Budget: Micro. A diner and some wonderful actors is all you need.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No. 2 pencil. His short scripts have been featured on MoviePoet.com, Simplyscripts, at https://www.scriptrevolution.com/profiles/david-troop, and on this here one. Currently, Dave is writing this review, but plans to write feature films in the near future and take Hollywood by storm. Well, not really storm – more like a sprinkle. He lives in the comatose town of Schuylkill Haven, PA where he is a proud grandfather, a father of two, and a husband of one.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.