The End in Sight – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

The End in Sight

A hired killer tries to finish one last job before going blind.

A bad guy with a soft spot – looking to do something right after a lifetime of mistakes…  What the heck is it about characters like this that captures the imagination?  Because they do. Every time.  They’re just so… more interesting than vanilla good guys. Screw Mark Hamill.  I’ll take Han Solo any day.  (And admit it…you would too.)  Hit men especially.  Watch the Professional or In Bruges, and dare to disagree.

The End in Sight is a short script that “hits” that exact note perfectly.  Enter Hugo – the consummate hit man.  He’s killed efficiently all his life. Now – unfortunately – he’s going blind.  Which, one could imagine, is really bad ju-ju for a man who relies on visual acuity…

Hugo’s trying to finish one last job before he retires: kill a gangster, and return a wayward prostitute, Winter, to a rival pimp named Skarda.  Needless to say – things get emotionally complicated and go horribly wrong.  Given the setup, this could have been a cliche script.  But The End in Sight does things right; pulling out twists and character beats that make the whole trip worthwhile. So if crime and thrillers are your forte, crack this one open. It’s got a killer ending…

About the writer: Breanne Mattson is no stranger to accolades.  Her feature lengths have made Nicholl Quarterfinalist three times (yeah, that’s three times, beeyotch!) She’s also made semi-finalist in Bluecat, Final Draft and honorable mention in TrackingB.  She’s also received a “worth the read” from Scriptshadow.  Her website can be viewed at www.breannemattson.com (IMDB credits here.)

Pages: 35

Budget: Okay. This one’s no “newbie” script.  Thirty five pages long, it features plenty o’ squibs and bullet hits,  stunt car driving, and both inside and outside locations.  But in experienced hands, this script could be amazing.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

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Mile 42 – Feature Length Review (Available for Production)

Mile 42

When an extreme distance runner encounters a human trafficking ring during a desert ultramarathon, he must battle both exhaustion and criminals to save innocent lives – and himself.

Some of the best feature scripts are first conceived as shorts. Which shouldn’t be a surprise. Because a short is like a literary dry run… a chance to test out a premise’s fledgling wings. Breathe first life into intriguing characters.

And then, if that short lives up to its promise (and more), a writer starts to feel a certain itch; the sudden need to expand. To truly explore a story’s potential. Go the distance with it, as it were.

And speaking of distance…

A little over a month ago, STS reviewed the short script Mile 42 (short version available here.) An evocative thriller with a unique premise. And a tantalizing main character: Jose Marquez – a long distance runner (the marathon equivalent of John McClane.)

Well, we here at STS feel the only thing better than a good thing is a lot more of it. So for your May 1st reading pleasure, we bring to you the feature of Mile 42: a thriller unlike others…

Picture this, if you will. A tractor trailer sneaks into Arizona in the dead of night. Its cramped cargo: fifty illegal Mexicans. Among the frightened passengers: Carlos and twelve year old son Toraido. The truck encounters unexpected company and makes a run for it. Horns blare. Tires screech. The trailer nose-dives over a ditch… resulting in wreckage, dead bodies, and a few (lucky?) survivors. Though injured, Carlos and Toraido make it out alive, along with a handful of others. The group splits up – running for their lives, and their freedom. Into drainage tunnels, and the night. For someone is still on their tail. Someone on the wrong side of the law.

…but they’re not the only ones running. You see, an ultra Badlands Marathon is underway. Over one hundred plus miles of grueling desert torture, deadly heat. Among the competitors is Victor Marquez: Doctor and Army Combat Veteran. Is he undertaking the race for fun? Well, not exactly. More like proving himself, and chasing his inner demons away. He whiles away the miles chatting with fiancé Cynthia on a radio scanner, attempting to keep his mind sharp while his battered body does what it can. At least until he loses the signal. Out of range.

Running may work for personal demons. But other nightmares aren’t as easily chased away. Which is what Jose discovers when he crosses paths with Carlos and Toraido. And someone else… with a rifle. As bullets fly, Jose is forced to flee with the others, in fear of his life. And finds himself caught between a deadly conspiracy – and an even more deadly desert heat.

A gem of a thriller, Mile 42 is custom made for an experienced indie director looking for that project to take him/her to the next level. Limited location. Tons of action. A three dimensional, sympathetic protagonist… and a premise that stands out from the cookie cutter crowd. Our recommendation? Grab this one. And run with it.

About the writer: John P. Dowgin is a playwright, screenwriter, director and actor, as well as a founding member of the production company The Porch Room (porchroom.com) for whom he directed the original work ‘Antony & Cleopatra: Infinite Lives” at the 2013 New York International Fringe Festival. Two of John’s plays have been published in the compilation “Accidents Happen” by Samuel French, and have been performed in New York, Los Angeles, Indianapolis, Toronto, Dublin, and Australia. A number of his screenplays are also in ‘development’, which he suspects to be a theoretical dimension like Oz. He lives in New Jersey with his wife and son.

Pages: 96

Budget: Given the action scenes and extras, this one’s not meant for a newbie. But for a skilled indie director? That would be a perfect fit!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

 

Confiance – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Confiance

Preparing for the speech of his career, a young Bishop gets an unexpected call

Oh, the duplicitous lives we mortals sometimes lead. Growing up, we’re taught to aspire to conduct free from “sin”. Yet each of us is human, all the same. With urgings. Longings. Weaknesses. Needs. That’s a lot to contend with – for anyone. And how much worse must it be for those called to religious careers? And held to a far higher standard?

…Such it is with Tom Gray; the youngest Bishop ever in the Anglican Church. At the tender age of thirty-eight, he’s already made quite a mark. Hobnobbing with high-level officials, establishing parishes in far flung countries, like Kinshasha in the Congo.

Now, he’s about to take the biggest step of his career – a sermon at Westminster, standing at the Archbishop’s very side.

There’s just one teeny, tiny problem. A girl from his African parish, named Keicha. And their infant son, William.

Waking up late, Tom’s scrambling to prepare notes. Coordinating with his wife, Elizabeth.

Which is when Keisha calls, terrified. Men are trying to break into the parish. She and the baby are alone; Tom’s bodyguards no-where to be found. Keisha suggests calling the police – but Tom nixes that idea. Real quick. Involve the cops, and his secret life will be revealed to the world; destroying everything he’s worked so hard for. Then the Archbishop calls on the other line – anxious about Tom’s whereabouts. The press is gathering. Where the HELL is he??

A panicked Tom tells Keisha to escape with the baby through a tunnel beneath the vestry. It’s safer (and more discrete). Even if the cops did arrive on time, the local authorities are corrupt, and likely to be as bad as the thieves.

But is escape possible – for Tom OR Keisha? Because when one lives a double life, the truth often gets twisted. In evil, dangerous ways…

Smoothly written by Tony French, Confiance is perfect for directors specializing in thrillers. A cap to anyone’s video resume; a delicious, dark and twisted tale.

About the writer Tony French: I’m a freelance film and TV editor by day and budding screenwriting by night. I’ve been writing off and on now for around five years with three features and a couple of shorts to show for it. Although the features will never see the cold light of day as I don’t feel the writing was good enough. I then took a year off from work to live with friends in LA where I went on various short writing courses and during that time wrote a short animation which got into the semi-final of Bluecat Screenwriting competition in Hollywood. This has given me the motivation and belief to continue to learn and create more stories. I’ve also written another couple of shorts, Confiance being one of them, which I hope to find a manager/producer/production company willing to join forces and help get it made. Want to contact Tony about Confiance (or other work)? Reach him at tonydfrench “AT” gmail (www.tonydfrench.com.)

Pages: 13

Budget: Not expensive. One or two locations. A few terrific actors needed. 😛

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

A Kindness – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

A Kindness
Sometimes, it’s Cruel to Be Kind. In the RIGHT measure…

One page.

One location: the death chamber/a prison cell.

Two people: a doctor, and a desperate patient.

One dilemma: the patient wants to die. The doctor doesn’t quite know why.

DOCTOR: How is death a kindness?

Sure, the Chinese conquest is audible outside – but who wishes for death because of that?

It’s not just that. There’s one more reason. A reason far less noble than avoiding capture. A reason the doctor understands… deep down.

And it’s reason that may factor into his decision… even with soldiers pounding on their door.

What’s that reason? Will the needle find his patient’s arm? Take a minute out of your day to read A Kindness and find out!

And grab it for option before the opportunity (and life) slips away.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: The co-writer of the acclaimed graphic novel Chasing the Dead, Tim Westland received first place for Balls Out in the NNYM 15 page contest. An outstanding writer with an eye for the details, his IMDB page can be found here.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Mile 42 – Short Script AND FEATURE Review (Available for Production)

Mile 42

When an extreme distance runner encounters a human trafficking ring during a desert ultramarathon, he must battle both exhaustion and criminals to save innocent lives – and himself.

 Sometimes, a story grabs you. Instantly. Takes command of your senses and doesn’t let go. Maybe it’s the opening action. Perhaps a telling line of dialogue. With Mile 42, it’s the clear and intense imagery that sucks you into the script. A tale solidly set in New Mexico: baking heat, jagged outcrops of rock, parched tarmac shimmers in the sun. NM’s not a state I’ve visited. But now I can say I’ve “seen” it – at least, through this script.

…and the eyes of Jose. The protagonist of the story, Jose’s a competitive long distance runner of the ultra-extreme kind. When we meet him, he’s hitting Mile 42. His base camp support, Cynthia, chatters via bluetooth in his ear, quoting lines from movies. Jose spits titles back at her; it’s a game that keeps his mind focused, even if his physical energy’s on low reserve. But Jose’s determined to soldier on. Miles ahead of him (out of sight) is Timson. His running nemesis and competitor.

Soon, a reception dead spot cuts off Jose’s connection to Cynthia. And he catches up to Timson.

Bullet ridden and dead in the road….

A shot rings out. A bullet tears through Jose’s sleeve. Someone’s shooting at him! The runner darts for shelter – summoning what meager energy he has left.

Scaling a rock, Jose spots his would-be shooter… And uncovers a whole truck of trouble, far beyond the normal concerns of marathons. Corrupt border guards have intercepted a group of illegal immigrants, and plan to hijack them for a slavery ring. Jose’s run smack dab into hell. Stranded in the desert. Alone – and being chased – by a sadistic group of criminals determined to wipe all witnesses from the earth.

Faced with a series of unexpected challenges, Jose battles the odds and desert heat. But can he overcome his own frailties in time to save himself and the others? Or will he end up like poor, dead Timson?

Excellently paced, Mile 42 moves swiftly towards the finish line – a top notch action thriller, with a vibrantly real protagonist. It’s an action short that’ll leave you (and your audience) breathless. Cheering for the hero all the way.

And if you like the short… You have to read the feature length. 

A riveting expansion of the premise, character and story, Mile 42 is an indie must-read.  If you’re a director looking for a low budget thriller – freshm unique and full of character – then look no further.

Read the feature length script here, and contact John before it’s gone!

Short version link available here.

About the writer: John P. Dowgin is a playwright, screenwriter, director and actor, as well as a founding member of the production company The Porch Room (porchroom.com) for whom he directed the original work ‘Antony & Cleopatra: Infinite Lives” at the 2013 New York International Fringe Festival. Two of John’s plays have been published in the compilation “Accidents Happen” by Samuel French, and have been performed in New York, Los Angeles, Indianapolis, Toronto, Dublin, and Australia. A number of his screenplays are also in ‘development’, which he suspects to be a theoretical dimension like Oz. He lives in New Jersey with his wife and son.

Pages: 17

Budget: Given the action scenes and extras, this one’s not meant for a newbie. But a skilled indie director looking to put a shining gem on his resume? That would be a perfect fit!

About the guest reviewer: Anthony Cawood is an aspiring screenwriter from the UK with a number of scripts in various stages of production, two of which have just wrapped shooting. His script, A Certain Romance, recently won in the Nashville Film Festival Screenwriting Competition (short script category). You can find out more at http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

 

Jam – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

JAM
Traffic can be murder…

In “Close Encounters Of The Third Kind“, Richard Dreyfuss’ character Roy Neary is an electric company lineman in rural Indiana. Stopped in his truck at a railroad crossing, he’s lost at a metaphorical crossroads. A man of action, Roy unfolds a map.

Suddenly: a row of mail boxes rattle to his left. His truck loses all power and a giant light engulfs his vehicle from above like a higher power; illuminating Roy’s journey towards truth… and a more mysterious world than he thought he knew.

Ray (yes, one vowel away from Roy) is in no hurry in Pete Barry’s “Jam“. Roy’s merely one of many stuck in his car during a Route 37 traffic mess. Fine, he reasons patiently. Let’s take advantage with some AM radio and a nap. Leaning back, he closes his eyes. But then the radio starts to crackle…

And emits a NOISE. It’s not static; more a rumbling snarl, topped with a whistling teakettle shriek.

Ray grimaces and twists the knob again. Then, beneath the ugly sound, a conversation emerges:

LATE (V.O.)
– can’t be late for this meeting!

OFFICE LACKY (V.O.)
Calm down. You’ve still got twenty minutes.

Ray turns up the volume, curious.

LATE (V.O.)
He said the next time I missed a meeting, forget it, I’m pink slipped.

OFFICE LACKY (V.O.)
I’ll talk to him. Where are you?

LATE (V.O.)
I’m stuck in traffic! There’s a goddamn overturned truck on route 37!

Ray sits up, looks around. Everyone’s on their cell phones. And he can HEAR THEM ALL. His radio is a conduit to the conversations in the other cars!.

At first, it’s all fun and games as Ray listens to a conversation between a young, beautiful woman in the car next to him, describing her panties to a deep-voiced man. But, the mood instantly sobers when he turns the dial.

At 610 he finds a different conversation:

SIGHTLINE (V.O.)
-might be listening, this guy. The signals are bleeding together, we could be compromised.

COMMAND (V.O.)
We’ve got to keep off the radio. Do you have a bead on him?

SIGHTLINE (V.O.)
I’ve got him in crosshairs. He’s listening to 610 on the AM dial.

The funny thing about hearing things unintended for your ears is – you can never un-hear them, no matter how hard you try. And Ray has heard too much.

Soon, he breaks from his car in a sprint, not knowing what he’s escaping from. But you can’t run from the unknown, you can only hope it passes. Like a traffic jam.

As a script, Jam is “jammed packed” with excellent dialogue, paced to perfection. Lined bumper to bumper with fun and intrigue, directors should be revving to hit the gas and drive this script home. Jam’ll be relatively easy to pull off with the right location – and 70 friends with cars.

Pages: 6

Budget: Not bad at all; with a little creativity (and access to a road.)

About the reviewer: Zack Zupke is a writer in Los Angeles. He can be contacted via email at zzupke “AT” yahoo

About the writer:Pete Barry is an award-winning screenwriter, playwright, actor, director and musician. His short plays have been published in numerous collections. He’s also a cofounder of the Porch Room, a film and theater production company, website available at http://www.porchroom.com/.  Please feel free to reach out to him with script requests at petebarry27 “AT” Hotmail.

READ JAM HERE!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Loose Screws – Featured Television Pilot Review (Available for Option)

Loose Screws

A successful psychiatrist finds himself losing his grip on reality – and turns to an old patient – a girl with a mysterious mathematical talent, that he used and betrayed years ago.

As of this writing, the average household has access to over 100 TV channels. Multiply that by 24 hours in a day, 7 days in a week. That gives you a rough estimate of the number of TV shows on the air. For the mathematically challenged, that’s almost 17,000 shows. (We’re considering 30 minute sitcoms and reruns to be a wash, okay?)

Yet, how many of these are memorable?

Not that you can really blame the writers.  Or networks. There are just so many aspects involved in making a hit show that “clicks.” But when it does… the result is Visual Crack. Spectacular.

Think of shows that have captured the national imagination. The Sopranos. Breaking Bad. Then there are the metaphysical offerings: Twin Peaks. The X-Files. Lost. But what do the worlds of Tony Soprano and Dana Scully have in common? A fresh concept. An intriguing or mysterious premise. And characters that aren’t (yawn) cliché. Assemble those factors together, and the result is, well… magical.

It’s 2015 – a brand new year. Time for new talent, and new ideas. As 2014 fades away, STS is honored to offer up a TV pilot that we feel has all the right ingredients to be a major hit. The name of the series?

Loose Screws.

First, let’s meet the cast of characters. Dr. William Pritt – a Stanford educated shrink: currently stuck in the minor leagues, but looking to make it big. One of his patients is a fascinating case. Miriam Melzter, 16 – a maladjusted teen just a few crappy days short of suicide. And a gifted math savant… one that makes Rain Man look positively lame. She sees things in numbers that – aren’t easy to explain. And Pritt sees something in Miriam. Potential. And a way out. For him.

Flashforward 13 years. Pritt’s hit the big time. He’s one of two partners in the glitzy Manhattan Office of Kendorski and Pritt. K&P’s got a pretty elevated clientelle – rich and famous socialites. And politicians such as Kip Parkinson, a fat cat (literally) attempting to wriggle out of a gay sex scandal… by any means necessary. But Pritt’s got Parkinson figured out.   He’s heard all the lies and tricks before (he and his partner – Dr. Miles Kendorski – invented several of them!) Yes, Pritt’s got life figured out. Or at least, so it seems.

But Miles has discovered something about his partner. He picks up the phone to make a few calls. Cash in some favors – and change alliances…

On his way home through the Manhattan streets, Pruitt encounters a vision: a homeless family, begging for food. He blinks. They’re gone. And everyone’s staring right at him. Later, he sees Miriam on the train. But it’s just his imagination. Rattled to the core, Pritt stumbles to a news vendor. He grabs the nearest paper – and writes down a strange stream of code. Just a nonsensical series of numbers. Meaningless. At least to him.

Back at home, Pritt faces an icy reception from wife Janet (and teen son Sean). Especially when he mentions Miriam’s name – and lets slip that they once had an affair. The Homeless Family makes another appearance… leaving Pritt worried for his sanity.

Within twenty four hours, Miles betrays him… leaving Pritt with nowhere to turn. The beleagered shrink takes off in search of Miriam: the only person capable of decyphering his visions. That is, if she’ll talk to him.

But that’s just the icing on the cake. Loose Screws has far more in store underneath. It would be a sin to reveal too much; you won’t find further spoilers here. But here’s a hint of what’s to come: double dealings, secret societies, lots of buried history, and the question of what’s real vs. hallucinary – you won’t be able to turn your eyes away. And that’s what makes for great TV. Great characters thrown into a complicated world – that keeps you begging for more.

Ten years ago, a show like Loose Screws would have been impossible. Too gritty, too complex… too complicated. But with the rise of HBO, Showtime, Amazon and AMC, TV has reached its second Golden Age. The time is right for a show like this (and fully developed characters like this) to shine. It’s just a matter of what lucky network grabs it first….

About the writers:

Tim Westland – an award winning screenwriter, 2014 Page International Quarter Finalist and co-author of the acclaimed comic book series/graphic novel “Chasing The Dead”.  Tim is currently writing the adaptation of the novel, “Quantum Lens“, by New York Times Best Selling author Douglas E. Richards.

John Robbins – a 2014 Page Quarter Finalist, John resides in San Diego and can be reached at jpjrb1 “AT” gmail, or via website: http://www.johnnyrobbins.com.

Pages: 56

Budget: Not crazy. A standard city-based television budget should suffice.

CONTACT THE WRITERS FOR THE SCRIPT!
jpjrb1 “AT” gmail AND Timwestland “AT” hotmail

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.