Lone Star Runner Hunnies – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

Lone Star Runner Hunnies

Fleeing a drug deal gone wrong, four girls held up in a lonely Texas diner face the dilemma of capture vs saving a mortally wounded friend.

Roadside diners make great locations – for almost any genre you can mention. Comedy. Romance. Horror. And crime dramas are no exception. (Pulp Fiction and Reservoir Dogs, anyone?) But you need a talented writer to populate such a setting properly. With fresh, interesting characters.

Fortunately, Lone Star Runner Hunnies has a surplus. Enter Ameena, KJ and Scotty.

As the script opens, the girls burst into a rundown café, agitated and out of their depth. They’re clearly running away… from something or someone. Scotty and Ameena dash immediately towards the back, ignoring startled clientele. They’re heading towards the restrooms. And for whatever reason, it’s urgent. (Get your minds out of the gutter, folks. This is a crime script – not comedy.)

KJ plops down at the nearest table. She’s quickly approached by the cook, a down-home type named Jake. Though concerned, Jake does his best not to pry. He takes KJ’s order. She grills poor Jake about the soup. And uses the menu to hide her tears.

Meanwhile, in the bathroom – things are getting urgent. Ameena cleans up the blood as best she can, hands Scotty a syringe…

…and joins KJ outside, whispering across the table. What are they gonna do next? And is Scotty even gonna survive?

Which is when an unexpected visitor appears at the door. Throwing the mother of all spanners in the works…

What makes a good crime story great? Well, just like diner food – there are a few essential ingredients. Interesting personalities. Rich visuals. A ticking clock of some kind. Not to mention mystery.

An expert of this genre, writer CJ Walley breathes fiery life into his characters – and leaves plenty of questions between the lines. What happened before the diner? We never fully know. But we (and Scotty) are dying to find out. With Lone Star Runner Hunnies, Wally’s recipe is complete. Resulting in an expertly executed narrative that (unlike Scotty) deserves to be shot.

Pages: 7

Budget: Relatively small – rent a diner and that’s it.

About the reviewer: Anthony Cawood is an award winning screenwriter from the UK with 4 short films produced and a bunch of other scripts optioned and/or purchased.

Links to his films and details of his scripts can be found at http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

About the writer, C.J. Walley: I began writing in 2012 and I’m pleased to say it’s been very exciting so far. I have been fortunate enough to have a short produced by a director in London and Amazon Studios have spotlighted one of my features as a notable project. My scripts place within the top 10% of various major screenwriting competitions and, as I continue to write new specs, I am remotely collaborating with a producers, directors, and actors in LA, NYC, New Orleans, Atlanta, Washington DC, Zurich, Amsterdam, Sydney, and Dallas while occasionally blogging for Stage 32.  If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, then I’d love to join forces with you whatever the scale, do not hesitate to reach out and drop me a line. (CJ “AT” CJwalley DOT COM; http://www.cjwalley.com

 READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

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Whiteout on Route 89 – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

Whiteout On Route 89
A blizzard on Route 89 has dire consequences for a woman on the eve of her wedding day, and the taxi driver who gets her to confess all.

There’s something about the quiet cold of a frozen winter night in the middle of nowhere. It elicits a certain instant honesty for no other reason than the human body cannot lie when it’s fighting for survival.

Its vulnerabilities become unmistakably apparent as it shakes to stay alive, exposing its very soul with every plume of exhaled breath, leaving a trail with every step.

It cannot hide.

A young woman in “Whiteout On Route 89” tries to hide in the back of a long, snowy cab ride in the middle of nowhere. But, taxi drivers are part barkeep, part psychologist. They’ve seen it all, heard even more and have driven down every road. Especially Edie’s 60-something driver Reg, who politely grills her as holiday music cheerfully emits from his CD player.

REG
So, mind if I ask what you’re doing all the way out here?
I mean it’s beautiful and all but this time of year…
I hope you got a proper place to hole up cause —

EDIE
Me and my fiance got a cabin down by the lake. We’re getting married Christmas Eve,
he’s staying in town with the boys while me and some of the girls…

Her words trail off.

And Reg is on the trail of something he knows to be deeper than the snowdrifts building all around them. Perhaps that’s what drove the deer onto the road in front of them.

The violent impact propels the animal onto the bonnet. Reg pulls the car hard the other way again to right it. The out of control vehicle smacks into a guard rail, becomes airborne, careens over a bank, slides into a ravine. The sickening crunch of metal and glass as it slams sideways into a felled log, then comes to a stop. The deer slides off the bonnet onto the ground. Steam billows from the car bonnet. It spurts, hisses, then extinguishes.

The only thing more honest than winter is death. And the occupants of THIS taxi can smell a healthy dose of each in the air as they continue to unravel Edie’s real origin. And Reg’s destination, as well.

“Whiteout On Route 89” is a brittle and suspenseful ride, filled with sharp and brutally-honest dialogue. It’s reminiscent of the Coen brothers’ “Fargo” with it’s subtle textures and permeating use of nature as a central character. And, the ending would surely leave Marge Gunderson shaking her head.

This tale would make an incredible short for a brave cast and crew, who will surely have to battle winter to tell it right.

But, honestly, there’s no other way.

Pages: 17

Budget: Moderate. With a bit of nuance, all that’s really needed are two excellent actors, and a beaten up car with character…

About the Reviewer: Zack Zupke is a writer in Los Angeles. Zack was a latch-key kid (insert “awww” here) whose best friend was a 19-inch color television (horrific, he knows). His early education (1st grade on) included watching countless hours of shows like “M*A*S*H,” “Star Trek” and “The Odd Couple” and movies like “The Godfather,” “Rocky” and “Annie Hall.” Flash forward to present day and his short “The Confession” was recently produced by Trident Technical College in Charleston, SC. He’s currently working on a futuristic hitman thriller with a partner and refining a dramedy pilot perfect for the likes of FX. You can reach Zack at zzupke “at” yahoo.

About the Writer: Libby Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She has also worked professionally as a freelance web-content editor and proofreader. She is thrilled her first ever entry (Simpatico) into a Screenplay Comp – The LA Comedy Festival ‘Short’ screenplay division took out Top 3 Finalist and hopes the high placing will be a continuing trend. Libby would love to see her words come to life on screen. She lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia, and describes him as being both a good and a bad influence on her writing. You can contact Libby at libbych “AT” hotmail.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

The Enchanted Quill – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

THE ENCHANTED QUILL
A troubled young woman discovers a magic software application that allows her to make all her wishes comes true, but at a price – each wish costs her a fraction of her soul.

No matter the setting or the time, Fairytales play on our most primal fears.

From our moral anxieties and deepest desires, to the monsters lurking in our subconscious, Fairytales resonate through the ages to serve as warnings to the frailty of human nature itself.

MILLY (V.O.)
Once upon a time there was a little
Princess who was betrayed by her
Prince Charming.

Milly was once a young, free-spirited innocent – that was until she met Malcolm:

YOUNGER MALCOLM
Your parents said they would be late.
They asked me if I could give you a
lift home.

Princess Milly unwittingly accepts, and so finds her young life destroyed; locked in a cycle of tragedy and abuse as she’s passed from one monster to the next.

The years pass and the abusers move on – leaving Milly to struggle with the horrors of a childhood destroyed.

One day she stumbles upon a dark forest (known as the internet, or the ‘web’) where a magic app called The Enchanted Quill sings her a siren-song promise of revenge.

Of course, a deal like this comes at a price, but what’s 5% of your soul per wish when sweet vengeance is at hand?

And this is where we join the tale. Not in an enchanted kingdom far away, but an abandoned warehouse where Malcolm and cohorts find themselves trapped… with Milly wielding her Enchanted Quill to control everything they do.

And this Princess is in no mood for forgiveness:

MILLY
Fuck yeah! Let’s get the endgame
rolling. Enchanted Quill obey my
whim, give Malcolm a compound arm
fracture, through the skin! Woo, I
did a poem!

Milly proceeds to recount her tale, jumping from the past to the present as she puts her tormentors through their own personal (and much deserved) Hell. From the visceral to the surreal: fingernails are removed, arm bones gnawed. Even the repetition of mundane tasks takes a torturous form.

Imagine taking off your shoes only to put them back on again – over and over and over… until they bleed.

Drawing out the darker aspects of a little known fairytale called The Enchanted Quill, writer Mark Renshaw delivers a uniquely modern tale of retribution replete with monsters, tortured souls and unflinching violence.

If you like to wring every last drop of blood from your horror, then Quill is a pure classic for you.

Pages: 10

Budget: Four characters. Simple enough location wise with one main room and a handful of exterior shots informing the flashbacks. Plenty of gore on this one so experience with make-up and some creative effects would be a bonus.

About the Reviewer: Steve Miles started writing scripts around five years ago after realizing that his social life was vastly overrated. He enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit – from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums.

About writer Mark Renshaw: Mark has been escaping into his own personal version of reality he calls his Mindverse since he was a youngling. Sometimes these adventures escape into our dimension in the form of scripts and stories. At other times they just drool out of his mouth.

Despite the drool, his scripts and short stories have reached semi-finals and finals of several film festivals and competitions, he even won a Top Pick award in the Reel Writers Competition last year.

Not content with writing, sometimes he pops on a producer’s hat and breathes cinematic life into his creations. His latest film called Surrender, which he wrote and produced, was released in September. Since then it has been in two film festivals and won four awards.

Mark’s produced films and short scripts can be viewed at your leisure on his website at http://www.mark-renshaw.com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

The Women in My Family – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

The Women in My Family

“On a blistering day in 1871, a young Mexican girl witnesses the death of her family… and her birth as a killer.”

A tarnished gold ring, a silver coin, and a brass button… The devil’s in the details. Sometimes, it’s the little things that cause the most damage, and make or break a master plan. As for writers: details make a story breathe. Rendered in full richness, they can mean everything.

In writer and filmmaker Kirk White’s western, The Women in My Family, details are a matter of life and death. At least, for young Ofelia (8). It’s 1871 in Nogales, Arizona. Ofelia’s family farm is invaded by two outlaws, in search of her father. Her father flees, leaving behind a gold ring he hopes will buy Mother, Ofelia, and 10 year old brother Alejandro precious time. Instead, Mother hands the ring to Alejandro and forces the children to hide under a bed. Along with strict instructions to stay put. Then she departs to bargain with the two intuders, savage monsters named Hawk and Wolf.

But Alejandro has a plan of his own; and a silver coin he has found. Arguing with Ofelia, he insists he can save the family, using the ring and coin as barter. He races out to help Mother, but it’s too late. Mother and Alejandro are attacked and killed – in brutal, ugly ways. Armed with a kitchen knife, Ofelia attempts to intervene. One of the deranged creatures turns on the girl. His boot spur slashes her face, and she drops next to her dead brother. She awakes later – the only survivor. And discovers a brass button ripped from Hawk’s coat in Alejandro’s now cold hand.

Ten years later, a changed Ofelia will use the ring, the coin, and brass button to exact her impassioned revenge…

For filmmakers dedicated to the best in storytelling, TWIMF provides a treasure trove of vivid detail: a desert location in the old west, two hideous intruders, three round, symbolic objects. Even the jagged scar stretching from Ofelia’s mouth to her ear provides potential for gorgeous cinematography. The devil is certainly present in these details. And for this purpose, he’s quite welcome.

Any director who enjoys the challenge of elevated genres is in for a treat with TWIMF. It’s a riveting combination of revenge story/western in sheep’s – er- hawk’s and wolf’s clothing.

About the Writer:  Kirk White is an independent film maker, web sen”sation” and figure of note in the world of global logistics.  He is currently in pre-production on his second feature, The Soul Garden, which will basically be the art-house version of Re-Animator.  Kirk can be emailed at kirkwhitewrites “AT” gmail!!

Pages: 5

Budget: Moderate. A stand-in for a western town. Father, Mother, Alejandro, Ofelia, Hawk, Wolf and Blacksmith characters will need appropriate 1871/1881 time-period clothing.

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com!

CONTACT KIRK AT KIRKWHITEWRITES “AT” GMAIL FOR THE SCRIPT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Lavender’s Blue – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Lavender’s Blue

“A young thief finds compassion in the unlikely source of his arresting officer.”

Never underestimate the power of an effective film title. It’s the attention-getter. Titles can be quite literal (for instance Godzilla, The King’s Speech, or My Best Friend’s Wedding.) Or you may need to watch the movie to figure it out the reference: ala Enough Said, Jacob’s Ladder, and The Shawshank Redemption. Depending on who’s in control on movie night, sometimes the title is all an audience member knows going in. But – whichever direction you choose – the title needs to be relevant and stand out!

In Lavender’s Blue, the meaning of the title is subtle – emerging slowly as the drama enfolds. As the script opens, world-weary veteran Inspector Foster and young Sergeant Watts interrogate a sullen teen accused of stealing… of all things, a lavender scented gift pack of toiletries.

After a few grueling rounds of good cop/bad cop – and one rather sneaky maneuver on Foster’s part – they figure out the boy’s name: 17 year old Chris Turner. More digging uncovers the surprising reason for Chris’ theft. Foster and Watts find themselves faced with a decision: throw the book at the unlucky perp. Or take pity on the kid – bringing him (and his stolen loot) on an unexpected side trip…

An award winning tale, Lavender’s Blue is subtly written with multiple layers; perfect for any director looking to produce an emotionally complex drama that’ll stay with their audience long after credits roll.

About the writer: Boasting an MA in Scriptwriting for Film, Theatre, TV & Radio, MJ is an award winning writer, with shorts optioned and produced in countries as diverse as Croatia and Norway. Residing in sunny England, she is currently hard at work developing a series with the BBC Writersroom – as well as working on a number of features (including one low-budget horror and a fantasy adventure script.) Her website is available here: redcatwriter.wordpress.com/. MJ herself can be reached via mjhermanny – AT – gmail!

Pages: 5

Budget: Relatively low. Settings include an interrogation room and a “hospital” type setting. For your four main characters, make sure to get actors with a strong and nuanced emotional range. Because this script deserves to be done properly!

About the reviewer for Lavender’s Blue:California uber reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

Thicker Than Water – Short Script Review (Optioned!)

Thicker Than Water

“A successful drug dealer gets the shock of her life when her estranged younger sister shows up.”

Anyone who’s got a sister or brother knows it’s a given — an unwritten rule that you love them. Or at least you like them. A little bit. That’s how it’s supposed to be anyway… Interactions with siblings can be complicated. More likely than not, your mutual feelings probably run the gamut on a daily basis – somewhere between undying love and hate. (Don’t worry… we won’t tell your sister.)

But in MJ Hermanny’s award-winning drama Thicker Than Water, there’s more at stake than a few conflicted feelings.

It’s after midnight when the buzzer sounds at Trina’s plush London penthouse, and she’s stunned to hear Cassie’s voice, her younger sister. Trina hesitates at first; she and Cassie have been estranged for six years. Besides, Trina’s busy… counting the money from her drug business. But she hides the loot and lets Cassie in.

You can cut the tension with a knife as the two struggle to find common ground. Trina’s fancy surroundings are no longer a lure for Cassie. She’s been there, done that – and gotten out. And she wants the same for Trina. Well, actually, she demands it. Using her Metropolitan Police badge as leverage.

Trina challenges Cassie, “You wouldn’t bust your own sister!” The unwritten rule hangs thick in the air. Sisters are supposed to have each other’s back. Aren’t they?

Will Cassie succeed in changing Trina’s path? Or are these sisters heading for a showdown that makes sibling rivalry look like child’s play?

Similar to movies like August: Osage County, Rachel Getting Married and In Her Shoes, the relationship in TTW is intensely relatable. Simple to film, TTW delivers a compelling story with two strong female characters. So grab this one now — it won’t last long!

About the writer: Boasting an MA in Scriptwriting for Film, Theatre, TV & Radio, MJ is an award winning writer, with shorts optioned and produced in countries as diverse as Croatia and Norway. Residing in sunny England, she is currently hard at work developing a series with the BBC Writersroom – as well as working on a number of features (including one low-budget horror and a fantasy adventure script.) Her website is available here: redcatwriter.wordpress.com/. MJ herself can be reached via mjhermanny – AT – gmail!

Pages: 4

Budget: Low. Only two characters and one room. This story’s an easy shoot – with an up close and personal feel.

About the reviewer for “Thicker Than Water”: California uber reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

SoCal Gun Girls – Optioned!

Listen up, peeps! STS is thrilled to announce that C.J. Walley’s SoCal Gun Girls has now been optioned by Malcholm Reese, owner of MJR Visuals (Washington DC.)  We’ll keep you apprised as things progress.  In the meantime, head on over to C.J.’s personal website here, and see what else he has in store!

About the writer, C.J. Walley: I began writing in 2012 and I’m pleased to say it’s been very exciting so far. I have been fortunate enough to have a short produced by a director in London and Amazon Studios have spotlighted one of my features as a notable project. My scripts place within the top 10% of various major screenwriting competitions and, as I continue to write specs, I am remotely collaborating with a producer in LA on a comedy series, working with a director in New Orleans on a thriller, and blogging for Stage 32. I’m here to do two things, work hard and make friends. My writing has a down and dirty tone, deep emotion, gritty action, wry humor, and features strong female leads. If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, then I’d love to join forces with you whatever the scale, do not hesitate to reach out and drop me a line. (CJ “AT” CJwalley DOT COM; http://www.cjwalley.com)