The Changer – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

The Changer

Two bickering police detectives must find a way to capture the world’s most elusive criminal.

Some stories are tons of fun. Isn’t that what we go to movies for?

Angst, terror and philosophical symbolism isn’t needed for every film we see. Sometimes simple is the best. “Entertainment for the sake of entertainment” is a spectacular experience when done right. Especially when the jokes are primed to fly.

In his latest short The Changer, master storyteller David Troop makes a fun story live and breathe; resulting in chuckles galore!

Yet, for cops Kennedy and Harris, the events of The Changer are pure business. As often happens with film law enforcement types, these partners are different as two guys could be:

Kennedy’s a Caucasian veteran cop in his 40s – lacking any form of fashion sense. Of course, film-logic requires him paired with African-American Officer Harris. Ten years Kennedy’s junior, Harris is a “poster boy for Reebok.” Together, the two are on the job, seeking a mysterious master-of-disguise known simply as, “The Changer.

Tense and bickering from Page One, the couple track “the dude” to urban apartment 4D. With police badges on display, they bust down the door – only to find screaming hooker Petunia inside. Encouraged by the officer’s raised guns, Petunia points to the bathroom. Harris searches the area quickly, yet finds only – a cat inside.

Harris shrugs, turns his back. Allowing the Bizarre “Changer” to make his escape. Out the open bathroom window – down a rusty fire escape. Pretty soon, the chase is on (ala the Grand Budapest Hotel!

In hot pursuit of a “tall figure in a trench coat”, the partners race through alleys, down gritty streets. Eventually, Harris corners the perp. (Kennedy joins the chase somewhat late… having stopped to “question” the hooker privately!). But soon, Kennedy and Harris have their man…

Still – given The Changer’s “special set of skills”, the question is… Do they have him cornered?

Really?

Tongue planted firmly in cheek, TC is a fun – and very funny – ride.

Think movies like Ghostbusters, Back to the Future, Police Academy, Naked Gun or Groundhog Day. If you’re a director who loves goofy comedy, then TC is your blockbuster. Set your humor on stun. And pull the cinematic wool over your audience’s tears-of-laughter-filled eyes!

Pages: 9

Budget: Relatively low. Three talented male character actors (with good comedic timing) are required for the main roles. Plus a handful of extras. Settings include: Apartment interior rooms, stairway, streets, and an alley – all of which are easy to stage.

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working on a historical feature.

About the Writer: David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No. 2 pencil.  He’s a contributor and award winner on websites such as MoviePoet.com, WriterArena.com, and this here one.

 READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

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Afraid of the Dark – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

AFRAID OF THE DARK

In a world over-run by electricity-consuming monsters, only one source of power remains…

The Creature From The Black Lagoon, The War Of The Worlds,  Cloverfield, The Thing…

Notice a common theme? That’s right – monsters. In all their slimy, shape-shifting, slamming, shrieking, marauding glory. A few other films with monsters that leave a lasting impression: Alien, The Day of The Triffids, The Fly, and that granddaddy of all monster flicks (recently remade) – the 1954 classic, Godzilla.

The creation of the monster/creature feature has long held our attention. As a genre, Science Fiction and in particular ‘end of the world’ scenarios gained renewed popularity following World War II and the advent of the Cold War, when the combined fears of foreign occupation and the threat of global annihilation by nuclear weapons entered the public consciousness.

In Afraid Of The Dark Paul Clarke creates a unique monster of his own imagination. Cleverly combining elements of sci-fi, horror, and heart-pumping action, with a cursory nod to The Matrix and sub-genre cyberpunk, the story is set against that perennial crowd-pleasing backdrop of a post-apocalyptic ruin – burning waste, burned out cars, weeds, no electricity…

We open on a darkened room in the dead of winter. A conversation takes place between a young woman and a child, both of them huddled over their only source of light and heat, a solitary tungsten bulb. But this bulb is not connected to a cord and it’s not plugged into the wall. Instead we’re given a rather startling and surreal image. The bulb is connected to a writhing and pulsating black blob. And that blob is locked inside a cage.

The bulb is just about to go out. And for the remaining survivors now forced to live in lockdown, it appears time is running out.

Cue our protagonist and the female narrator of the tale and her retelling of how the beast came to be:

WOMAN (V.O.)

No one knows where they came from.

Some say a meteorite. Some say from

deep under the Earth. Others even

believe they’re something we cooked

up in a lab.  …

Whatever this monster is, and wherever it came from, there’s no doubt it is nightmare inducing… a formidable monster with a selective appetite.  Appetite for what? Well, you’ll just have crack this one open to find out.

Let’s just say the hunter is about to become the hunted. The remaining survivors are going to have to use the one element in the beast’s arsenal that they now need to survive – the beast himself.

Afraid Of The Dark is a richly layered and allegorical tale with a specific cautionary message about our reliance on energy and technology.

Filmmakers: Want to jumpstart your sci-fi/horror short-film career? Well, this one has the spark and surge you’ve been waiting for, and the power to leave audiences with a long lasting impression.

Pages: 10

Budget: Mid-range. You want a decent budget to do this right. But trust us – this one’s worth it!

About the reviewer: Libby Chambers has been writing all her life. Over her career, she’s worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, trained as a FAD, and served professionally as a freelance web-content editor and proofreader. She lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia, and describes him as being both a good and a bad influence on her writing. You can contact Libby at libbych “AT” hotmail

About the writer: Paul Clarke is an Australian based screenwriter who works as a cinema manager by day and paid coverage writer by night. His success so far has included a top 10 place in the Writer’s Store Industry Insider competition. And is currently working on a selection of short, feature, and pilot scripts. He can be reached at paul.clarke.scripts “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

The Test – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

The Test

In a futuristic society, life changes for a teenager who can’t pass the test.

In my humble but clearly infallible opinion, Ray Bradbury wrote some of the best short stories. Ever in the history of the world. Case closed; that is all.

And Bradbury’s novels aren’t too shabby either. Take for instance, Fahrenheit 451 – a story of censorship and social control echoed in Richard Russell’s SF short, The Test.

Fade in on the script. The time: the plausible near future. And the humble setting: a middle class home, with an almost 50’s domestic vibe.

Iola is the mother – tooling around the kitchen with her trusty tablet, preparing the family’s meals. Everything’s colored coded. For instance, today’s dinner is “green.” Which is probably just as well, because Iola doesn’t appear to be all there…

Husband Ron arrives from work moments later, dressed in a cop-like uniform. He regales his wife about his day (he’s some sort of ‘inspector librarian’) – and asks Iola about their son Josh’s test. Important scores came in today. But Iola’s unsure where they are; she’s forgotten already. A fact which doesn’t surprise Ron. And so he grabs a beer, and heads to Josh’s room…

…to be confronted with some cold, hard facts. Fourteen year old Josh failed his test miserably. And that means dire consquences – including “Educational Camp”. A prospect that Ron fears at all costs…

After dinner, Ron escorts Josh to “old man Granger’s” house. A thin old man with “wispy hair”, and dusty secrets in his basement. To save Josh from his mother’s fate, Ron’s arranged a special trip…

And that’s where my summary stops. No need to spoil a great script.

Instead, take a read for yourself – discover the multi-layered narrative and well-drawn characters; each with their distinct voice. Despite the SF setting, this is one cautionary tale that would be easy to produce. There’s no elaborate special effects – and a very human story at its core. It’d be a winner at festivals. And Ray Bradbury would be pleased.

Pages: 12

Budget: Relatively small, interior locations.

About the reviewer: Anthony Cawood is an award winning screenwriter from the UK with 4 short films produced and a bunch of other scripts optioned and/or purchased.

Links to his films and details of his scripts can be found at http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

About the Writer: Richard Russell lives in North Carolina where he plays golf and writes.  He has been writing since college when his short stories appeared in the university literary magazine.  He loves writing screenplays, and THE CALL, written with his partner, Felice Bassuk, is one of their best.  They have written an award-winning feature, THE KOI KEEPER, which they hope to see on the screen in the not too distant future.  Richard has a trove of shorts and feature length screenplays and continues to add to the inventory.  Writing remains the sole source of sanity in Richard’s chaotic world.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

Retrocausality – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Retrocausality

Scientists probe the past to find the source of radiation affecting the present only to discover the surprising cause.

From “Terminator” to “Time Bandits,” “Back To The Future” and “Planet Of The Apes,” the cinema has always been fascinated with the “what ifs” of time travel. Just as mankind is intrigued by what is to come, we’re equally enthralled by what could have been. It’s human nature to want to undo what’s been done. To rewrite what’s been written.

What screenwriter Ian J. Courter has written is an inventive twist on the genre. His short, “Retrocausality,” starts with overzealous scientists* who have cornered the market not only on time travel, but time sensing (the ability to peek back in time) as well. Their current project: a look back to ancient Mongolia. They’ve captured data on an unexplained nuclear reaction, and plan to open a real-time probe portal to investigate its origin.

In order to get the real-time data feed, scientist Jacobs (a “thin and geeky” brainiac) tells his pudgy counterpart Mabry they’ll need to boost the power of their generator to 112%. The request sets off big-time alarms in Mabry’s mind.

MABRY

What?! You trying to fry us all?

JACOBS

We’re good… as long as the coolant flows. If it starts to over-clock too much…

MABRY

(overlapping)

You mean “melt down.”

Jacobs spins his chair towards his colleague.

JACOBS

Semantics.

Semantics, indeed. But it’s too late to call off orders, and so the investigation proceeds. The portal to 1227 is opened and the probe slides through in daylight… at ground level, no less. Yet another high risk play.

MABRY

The doorway is at ground level.
Stuff can get through.

JACOBS

These are the coordinates they gave me.
Besides, as if birds couldn’t get through before.

Mabry opens his mouth to retort… And his worst fears are quickly proven right.

Within seconds, hundreds of Mongolian warriors spot the probe and race toward it, a hostile force. The scientists scramble to get the probe back through the portal – the primitive horde in hot pursuit. With the already steaming generator close to melt-down, the situation becomes a heart pounding race both for survival and time. Will the team close the portal before it’s breached? And even if they do… will there be a present day world left to save?

Are you a SF director in search of an intelligent time-travel tale…? One that’s unique, not cliché? Then give Retrocausality a scientific look. Yes, you’ll need a solid FX budget to do this one right. But it’s a story that audiences won’t soon forget!

* Arrogant scientists pushing the boundaries of nature…. what time travel story would be complete without some of them?!

Pages: 11

About the reviewer: Zack Zupke is a writer in Los Angeles. He can be contacted via email at zzupke “AT” yahoo

About the writer: Ian J. Courter has an academic and technical-writing background, and is published in both fields, so a shift to another form of writing seemed natural. He strives to combine his writing skills with nearly two decades of military experience to develop screenplays with vivid locations and in-depth, realistic characters. What started as a hobby quickly became a passion.  In only a few short years, he has written three feature-length screenplays and nine short scripts.  He currently has several feature-length scripts in various stages of development and continually seeks inspiration for more. His email address is ian.j.courter “at” gmail.com.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Glitch – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

Glitch

Winner of the Nashville Film Fest Short Script Award

A desperate wife resorts to extreme measures to ensure her husband gets the lifesaving operation he needs. 

Don’t let the Polly Annas lie to you.  Money, it’s darned near everything.  Especially when you don’t have it. And need it: desperately.  Hollow politician promises aside, that’s a universal fact of life. And just as likely to be true in the future as today.

Take Amber and George’s situation, for instance: living in squalor in a cyberpunk world.  In need of medical assistance.  You see, George needs his appendix removed. Preferably yesterday.  But they can’t afford the operation.  Even the dirty, black market kind.  Which leaves do-it-yourself as the remaining option. Too bad neither of them has surgical training.

Fortunately, there are walk-through education modules you can buy.  Which is about as good as it’s gonna get for impoverished folks like these two.  So Amber plunks a broken down virtual reality gaming set on her head, and rolls plastic across the kitchen table.  A quick injection sends George to la-la land.  Time for that crucial first incision.

Blood oozes. The clock ticks down.  Amber stumbles through the steps as best she can. And it looks like all’s going (relatively) well.  But is it truly ever wise to attempt surgery with last year’s Atari tech?  Not to mention an expired warrantee?

Written by screenplay veteran Anthony Cawood, Glitch is what SF should be.  Gritty, dark and satiric. And electrifyingly entertaining.

About the writer: I’m an award winning screenwriter from the UK with over 15 scripts produced, optioned and/or purchased. Outside of my screenwriting career, I’m also a published short story writer and movie reviewer. Links to my films and details of my scripts can be found at www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

Pages: 14

Budget: Pretty  low.  Two actors. And alley and a dirty room.  Oh – and some tripped out Nintendo gear.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

 

 

Incident on I-95 – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Incident on I-95

The arrival of an ominous stranger shatters the serenity of an idyllic American town.

It’s often thought Utopian societies are the way to go. In a time where the O-zone is depleted, terrorists could be living in the apartment below you, and there’s something scary on the news every day – it’s nice to imagine a world where peace, health, and tranquility reign.

One day – humanity dreams – the perfect world will exist. But is that truly possible? After all, one of the greatest contributors to Chaos is the nature of humanity itself. Humans – no matter how peaceful, clean, and healthy their environment – are at heart wild animals ready to strike. Especially when confronted with something they deem threatening.

The soul of Utopian SF is dark satire. And Fred Perry’s Incident on I-95’s got that. In spades.

Picture if you will: a man disembarks from a bus. A stranger out for an innocent walk, and on snowy peaceful night…

As Incident heads towards its crescendo, the man strolls casually through lanes and alleyways. Taking in the serenity of a small, perfect town. But his wanderings are about to take a turn for the worse – into the hands of a bloodthirsty, angry mob. As to what triggers the violence? Read the script. Because this is one satisfying twist you’ll never guess…

A simplistic story wrapped in rich, deep visuals, Incident on I-95 is a joy to read. All the way from its soothing beginnings, to the thought provoking climatic end!

About the writer, Fred Perry: Fred Perry has worked as a screenwriter in Europe, Mexico and the U.S., co-authoring six feature films for Omega Entertainment, Athens, Greece, as well as collaborating on multiple projects with Alfonso Arau (director of LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE and A WALK IN THE CLOUDS).

Fred’s screenplays have won numerous awards. His dark comedy short, FIVE DAYS IN CALCUTTA, won the Grand Prize in the 2014 Palm Street Films Screenplay Competition (shorts category), 1st Place at the 2014 Richmond International Film Festival (comedy screenplay genre), 1st Place, 2013 Fresh Voices Screenplay Competition (shorts), the Grand Prize, 2014 American Movie Awards (shorts), 1st, 2013 DC Shorts Film Festival and Screenplay Competition, 1st, 82nd (2013) Annual Writer’s Digest Writing Competition (subsequently published), the Gold Prize in the 2013 Hollywood Screenplay Competition (shorts), and 1st in the 2012 PAGE International Screenplay Awards (shorts). The script will shoot this January, directed by Dawn Fields of Palm Street Films.

His feature sci-fi script, CROSSINGS won the Grand Jury Award for Best Feature Screenplay at the 2014 Richmond International Film Festival, 1st at the 2014 Omaha Film Festival, 1st in the 9th annual Filmmakers International Screenplay Competition, 1st in the 2013 Holiday Screenplay Competition, and was a semifinalist in the 2013 Academy Nicholl Fellowships.

He is a published playwright, his two-act, THE ASCENSION OF TWYLA POTTS, winning the 2013 London Film Festival (stage play category), and earning the Special Marquee Award at this year’s American Film Awards. Fred has also written and directed plays at the Colony Theatre in Los Angeles and the Carrollwood Players Theatre in Tampa Bay.

Pages: 5

Budget: Moderate. A quick shot of a bus, and small-town streets. Lots of extra for the crowd.

About the reviewer, Rod Thompson: I have been writing creatively since I learned how to write. There is just something about telling a story that I can never get over. Storytelling in itself is like an old flame that occasionally comes to me and just says, “Use me.” The ability to watch a movie through words, or to craft a world in such a manner is the closest to Godliness that man will ever come. True story. Contact Rod at RodThompson1980 “AT” gmail.com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

 

The Ultimate Weapon – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

What can we say? STS is totally ahead of it’s time. 

For instance, take “Ultimate Weapon“, by Bill Sarre.  A sweet little SF piece that we reviewed back in (cough) February 2014.  We’re thrilled to announce that the script’s now been announced as a top six finalist for the Fresh Voices Screenplay Competition.  And who knows where it’ll go from there?  So folks, you’d better pick this one while you can. ‘Cause it might be off the market soon!

(Do we know how to pick ’em, or what?)  🙂

The Ultimate Weapon

A dying patient with an unusual story tries to explain to his doctor why he should fear the ultimate weapon.

Time travel stories can sometimes feel pretty stale.  There’s always someone going back to kill Hitler (or Hitler’s parents, or Hitler’s dog – you get the idea.)  Or do something else, like stop the Kennedy assassination.  Or kill John Connor.  You know, boring stuff like that…

And it could be argued that all – or at least most of it – has been done before.  Like zombies, it’s a genre that’s been done many times… to the point where it can be hard to find something fresh.

While The Ultimate Weapon doesn’t have a gimmick like Looper or Twelve Monkeys, this is a quality piece that has heart: focusing on the story of Abe – a dying man in a mental institution who claims to be from a horrific future. Sent back to stop a research lab, Abe fails… and now spends his remaining days telling his story to skeptical psychiatrist Dr. Simon.

A lot of the script is low budget – consisting of conversations between Dr. Simon and Abe.  There are FX aspects, scenes of future warfare which could be tricky…depending on how they’re done.  But if you’re in the mood for a good SF/Time Travel tale, this is one that you should crack open for consideration…

About the writer: An award winning writer, Bill Sarre has had scripts place both finalist and quarter finalist with Page and Bluecat.  Another short of his, The Grieving Spell, was recently grand prize winner of the London Film Awards. Bill can be reached at Bill.sarre “AT” gmail.com

Pages: 16

Budget: Moderate (or expensive, depending how FX heavy one wishes to get)

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.