Baby Steps – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Baby Steps

You never forget the first time you fall in love – even if you were in diapers.

Okay, we’ll admit that talking baby scripts aren’t always the best thing since sliced bread.  Case in point: the Look Who’s Talking Series, from One through…well, whenever they decided to finally stop torturing the movie going public.  Honestly – after the first fifteen rounds, baby poop jokes get kinda…stale.  To put it mildly.  (Even if poop itself continues to be funny to those of us with a case of arrested development.)

But occasionally, a script comes along that proves the exception to the rule.  A script with a gentle sense of humor, and heart.  Baby Steps is that exception.

This short follows the story of Millie and Hank – two babies that meet cute one day in the park; only to have their chance encounter and hopes dashed to smithereens when their mothers roll them away.  Their baby hearts are broken – never to meet again.  Or will they?  (Cue the dramatic music here.)

Folks, this one’s an honestly cute and intelligent romance.  Not to mention an easy shoot – baby wrangling and spit-up aside.  Give this short a shot… and make your audience feel young at heart.

About the writer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus.  Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced.   Dave would like to make it three.  He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com.  Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie.

Pages: 9

Budget: Very low.  Well, with the exception of dealing with baby actors.  Unless your friends have a few that can be borrowed…

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

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Heartbeat – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

Heartbeat
A florist is asked to help connect an unrequited lover with the object of his affection, with unexpected results.

A quiet day in a quiet florists finds store assistant, Maisy, counting her every heartbeat in a bid to alleviate boredom. As you can imagine – good luck there!

Enter Derin, scruffy but sincere, and – more importantly – in the market for flowers.

For Derin it’s a special occasion; he’s got love on his mind. A certain kind of love that requires a certain kind of flower. But Devin’s darned if he knows Tulips from Roses when it comes to floral arrays.

If only there were someone to guide him…

As luck (and training) would have it, Maisy has the answer to his quest – Daffodils.

Unfortunately for Derin, Daffodils aren’t in stock. They’re out of season and try as Maisy might, there’s no second choice when it comes to affairs of the heart.

So Derin leaves empty handed. Leaving Maisy alone – yet another flower to be ignored.

One quiet day rolls into another… until Maisy opens the shop and finds a surprise. A certain discovery that sets her heart to racing…. faster than she can count.

But read it yourself from here. Anything more would spoil the surprise.

Anthony Cawood’s Heartbeat offers a sweet tale of a young man’s first step on the road to love.

Its offbeat and understated style doesn’t so much take you for a ride – as smile coyly and ask you follow. Straightforward with minimal locations/characters and a few handy flowers as props, Heartbeat is everything a filmmaker looking for heartfelt romance (and an audience) could desire!!

Pages:  6

Budget: Low – as the man says… limited location and characters.  But lots of Heart!

About the reviewer: Steve Miles started writing scripts around five years ago after realizing that his social life was vastly overrated. He enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit – from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums.

About the writer: I’m an award winning screenwriter from the UK with over 15 scripts produced, optioned and/or purchased. Outside of my screenwriting career, I’m also a published short story writer and movie reviewer. Links to my films and details of my scripts can be found at http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Mendelevium – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Mendelevium

A “Battle of the Bands” helps two lead singers find love.

Mendelevium. It’s a synthetic element on the Periodic Table. Atomic Number: 101.

Don’t let the title lead you astray. There’s little science in Erich Von Heeder’s script, Mendelevium.

But tons of chemistry.

Incredibly engaging, Mendelevium is totally character-driven: an interview of Delores and Levi, two lead singers in rival punk rock bands.

When the couple first meet, it’s hate at first sight – an animosity of biblical proportions. As Delores articulates: “I was overcome with hatred for him. Like deep, blinding…” A helpful Levi completes the thought: “Murderous. Murderous hatred.”

…a hatred which escalates to an on-stage scuffle, after Delores throws a pound of cocaine at Levi. Followed by a night in jail. Talk about auspicious first dates!

“Where did you get a pound of cocaine?” their puzzled interviewer queries.

“Where do fish get scales?” Delores replies. “I don’t know. I’m a rock star, dude.”

Holding hands, the couple reminisce about their whirlwind romance, shortly after making bail. Delores: “We were hotter than a pequin pepper. A rare pepper that grows in the remote Andes Mountains of Chile, and if you even touch it to your mouth you die.”

Levi rolls his eyes. “Doesn’t exist,” he confides to the camera.

Imagine a punk rock reboot of When Harry Met Sally… that’s Mendelevium in a nutshell. Packed with witty dialogue, the script is funny, fresh – a standout vignette of two non-conformists in love. As Levi says, “Love’s a jester, man.” And a script like this is bound to shine.

About the writer: A humble denizen of Seattle (home of some amazing rock bands) talented writer Erich VonHeeder can be reached at erich_vonheeder “AT” yahoo

Pages: 5

Budget: Low-medium. All that’s needed is an interview room, an indie rock “stage”, a handful of crowd extras – and a couple with great chemistry.

About the reviewers: Scott & Paula Merrow are a husband and wife screenwriting team. Since 2006, they’ve written over 50 short screenplays, several of which have been produced. They tend toward family-friendly scripts, but they’ve written a little bit of everything: horror, fantasy, sci-fi, comedy,… the whole nine yards. They’re reachable at scott-paula “AT” comcast.net

CONTACT ERICH DIRECTLY FOR THIS SCRIPT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

The Diner – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

The Diner
Memories Matter. As do the bonds of love…

“Age is but a number”.

Banal as this saying may be, it’s true in many ways. No matter one’s age, human norms like memories and romance never fade… until the very end.

David M. Troop’s short The Diner offers heart-warming proof of this, as we bear witness to the wedding anniversary of two 75-year-olds, Ellen and Joseph.

They must’ve had a myriad of memorable moments together. But tonight, their celebration location is a humble diner, easily dismissed by anyone.

But to our geriatric duo, it’s unforgettable. Because this is where, over half a century ago, their love began to blossom.

And it also creates Ellie’s anniversary present to Joseph: a chance to remember where it all began before age distorts and deletes reality.

And Joseph uses the opportunity given to him wisely: he doesn’t just remind himself of their decades-old beginnings, he recreates them with Ellen, his life-long love.

Perfectly. Resulting in some odd looks from the diner staff. But there won’t be any odd looks from any audience to this microbudget movie – just praise.

Because like the diner Ellen and Joseph visit, The Diner is simple, yet nostalgically beautiful.

And truly impossible to forget.

Pages: 5

Budget: Micro. A diner and some wonderful actors is all you need.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No. 2 pencil. His short scripts have been featured on MoviePoet.com, Simplyscripts, at https://www.scriptrevolution.com/profiles/david-troop, and on this here one. Currently, Dave is writing this review, but plans to write feature films in the near future and take Hollywood by storm. Well, not really storm – more like a sprinkle. He lives in the comatose town of Schuylkill Haven, PA where he is a proud grandfather, a father of two, and a husband of one.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

You Destroy Me – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

YOU DESTROY ME
A man on a park bench tries to eat his lunch, but he scoots away from the woman beside him. When the offended woman questions his actions, it leads to a series of bitter insults which arouses them both.

Remember the cheesy line from Jerry Maguire: ‘you complete me’?

The world of ‘You Destroy Me’ may not be that romantic. But who needs romance when you have lust!

On your mark, and get set – to meet protagonists Max and Grace. They’re two strangers in a park, minding their own business and enjoying lunch.

That is, until the twin forces of repulsion and attraction rear their ugly heads.

Try as they might to ignore each other, this odd couple just can’t help but exchange insults.

MAX
You know what they say about guys with big noses.

GRACE
Yeah. They’re ugly and stupid.

Bringing up a subtle point. No, not about the dimension of noses and quasi-stubby anatomical parts.

Rather, that love and hate are separated by a fine line. A line Max and Grace prove more than happy to cross. Think Pitch Perfect mixed with Bumper and Fat Amy: that’s the gist of the chemistry these two share.

As Max and Grace’s insults spiral out of control, the groping starts – actions so intimate that passersby stop and stare.

When it comes to love and war, everything is fair. Abandon peace and give love/hate a chance. Especially when it comes to this script. It’s fun. Witty. And sure to win over even the most spiteful fans.

Pages: 7

Budget: Low – easy to cast and set in one location, this is an easy short to shoot. 4 actors – 2 guys, 2 gals. That’s it.

About the reviewer: Elaine Clayton is a London-based screenwriter, who has written several well received shorts and is currently doing a Masters in Playwriting and Scriptwriting. Comfortable in a broad range of genres, Elaine has an innate sense of structure and arc development. Contact her at Elaine_clayton(AT)hotmail(.)co(.)uk OR visit emjclayton.wordpress.com to discover more.

About the Writer: Jason K. Allen is a writer and filmmaker from Nashville, Tennessee. His screenwriting credits include the short films AMERICAN SOCK, which won Best Screenplay at the 2014 San Diego Film Awards, and AUTUMN LOVERS, winner of the Audience Award at the 2013 Artlightenment Festival in Nashville. He also wrote the feature film LUCKY FRITZ starring Julia Dietze (IRON SKY) and Corey Feldman. You can contact Jason at allen.jason.k (at) gmail. See IMDB for his complete credits: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm3021924

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

Our Time Deserves a Love Song – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

Our Time Deserves a Love Song
An aging musician relives his first love when someone asks what inspired him to write a particular love song.

Fact: The worlds oldest song, an Ancient Egyptian melody in 1400BC, was a love song; a tribute from a man to his wife.

And judging by the current charts, the magic of love has and continues to perennially create thousands of spellbinding sounds for our ears to enjoy, many based on personal experiences of the artist.

Our Time Deserves A Love Song delves into the backstory of “Love Song”, an unreleased track by acoustic legend Adam Stern. Asked by a superfan on a chat-show TV interview about the origins of the tune, we’re whisked back over 3 decades to his teenage years in coastal South Africa.

At first, there’s not even a note of love in the sea air. His parents are divorced, and his middle-aged Dad’s driving him to his former other half. Also in the car is Father’s new girl, a beauty half his age. Of course, Adam’s parents end up relishing the chance to insult each other when they arrive.

But adults aren’t the only ones insulting one another – Adam’s non-conforming music taste and fashion sense sees him ostracized by the local cool kids.

Yet it’s at this point when the first verse begins:

GIRL (O.S.)
Don’t sweat them retahds.

Sure, it ain’t the most romantic sentence, but this girl, Mary, turns out to be perfectly in tune with Adam.

As they bond through their love of music and having family problems, it’s clear these two go together like guitar and drum, complimenting one another perfectly.

Sadly, as with all good songs, this one ends suddenly and far too soon. So Adam does the only thing he can do: compose a tribute to this brief romance that’s so beautiful the audience cannot help but applaud loudly when he performs it.

And if you show this film at festivals, real life audiences will have a similar reaction!

Pages: 12

Budget: Moderate. Though, get a good tune for this one!

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: An award winning writer AND photographer, Marnie Mitchell Lister’s website is available at http://brainfluffs.com/. Marnie’s had multiple shorts produced and placed Semi-final with her features in BlueCat.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

The Mating Dance – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

 The Mating Dance

When it comes to Romance, listening to advice can lead to unexpected results…

Ah – the love story. Nowadays, almost every movie has one. Even genre movies throw in a handful of romance. Milk, Iron Man, The Wolf of Wall Street. Even the animated hit Frozen gets in its share of kissy-cuddly action. It’s almost a required sub-plot B.

For the romantic-comedy, of course, relationships take center stage. Two people “meet-cute.” Life throws obstacles in their way – simultaneously tearing them apart, yet bonding them subtly closer. Just as they realize they’re meant for each other, a misunderstanding causes a tragic break up. Ultimately, the couple reconcile and kiss. The curtain falls. The last scene fades.

Yep, getting to “Happily Ever After” requires some choreographed steps. But even if you’ve heard this song before, doesn’t mean you’ve seen the latest moves.

In her short The Mating Dance, talented writer Marnie Mitchell-Lister puts a fun, original spin on that never-ending ballad of romance…

Separate guests at the Hilton, singles Jake and Marla literally bump into each other at the reservation desk. Their bags become entangled, resulting in several clumsy “dance steps”. When they finally break free, an embarrassed Jake heads for the hotel lounge. Sure, Marla’s cute and all. But Jake’s recently divorced. It’s been awhile since he’s been in the game. To kill time before his flight, Jake impulse-buys a book at the convenience stand: The Mating Dance for Men, by Ramesh Kumar. May as well read up on the latest tips…

After signing out, Marla also stops by the stand. And a book catches her eye. The Mating Dance for Women, by Dr. Padima Sanghi-Kumar. She grabs it, making sure no-one sees… and settles in to read as well.

We all know what comes next. The couples’ eyes meet. Then an awkward pause – mutual attraction in the air. Soon, the Mating Dance begins in earnest. Awkward introductions. Stammered “lines”. The two stumble toward Getting to Know Each Other, aided by contradictory advice from their hidden books. Yep, Jake and Marla could use some guidance. But will they find their rhythm, or drive each other away?

Like the best romance comedies, TMD doesn’t take itself too seriously: alternating “voice-overs” from the books with awkward dialogue between the couple. (Anyone who’s been through a bad first date knows exactly what that’s like.) You’ll be rooting for Jake and Marla instantly. And you’ll want to read this to the end. Because happily-ever-after doesn’t happen when a couple meets. It always clicks at the end.

Comedy indie directors take note… This is one script worth choosing as your dance partner. A fun premise, and easy to film, it won’t be single for too long!

About the writer: Having completed 9 features and over 70 shorts, Marnie Mitchell-Lister has no plans on stopping. Currently, she’s working on a variety of projects; an animated feature, a psychological thriller and a TV pilot about a bored housewife whose quest for excitement gets her in all sorts of trouble. Some of Marnie’s work can be found on her website: http://www.brainfluffs.com.

Pages: 6

Budget: Three simple interiors: a hotel lobby, the hotel lounge, and a shuttle. Two main characters, a couple extras, and two actors with distinctive voices to provide voiceover dialogue, preferably with catchy accents.

About the reviewer: California uber reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on her animated feature. KP’s work is available at moviepoet.com!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.