At the End of My Day – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

AT THE END OF MY DAY

A ghost hunter takes off in search of an urban legend… only to find some mysteries are best left in the past.

Since the dawn of time, mankind has been held spellbound by ghost stories. Be it around the campfire, in print, or up on the silver screen, there’s something spine-tinglingly good about a spooky tale laden with creepy atmosphere and supernatural tormentors.

Much like the apparitions themselves, good ghost stories never die. They simply haunt our memory. Forever.

Some of the very best ones also serve up a twist ending that not only terrifies us to our core, but hits us on a deep emotional level as well. One need only think of M. Night Shyamalan’s superb The Sixth Sense – to appreciate just how effective this type of storytelling can be.

Writer Rod Thompson continues this proud tradition of spooky ghostly tales with his excellent At the End of My Day.

When eight year old Norman Ellis is confronted by a weeping apparition at the foot of the stairs, his entire world is changed. Though assured by his parents that there is no such thing as ghosts, Norman finds his belief system turned upside down. And a life long obsession forms. What exactly is the Crying Man? And what mystery lies beyond those tears?

Flash forward some forty years. Norman, now a practising parapsychologist, arrives at his childhood home determined to solve the mystery once and for all. Not that he comes alone. This time he’s forewarned and forearmed: with state-of-the-art equipment, and energetic assistant Curtis.

All to soon, darkness falls. Footsteps can be heard upstairs. The wood floors creak and moan… hints of some ghostly presence.

Sure enough, the Crying Man apparition floats towards them. And Norman looks upon it with terror and disbelief…

Will Norman and Curtis survive this ghostly encounter,or will yet more tears be shed – this time, at their grisly end?

Pages: 8

Budget: low.

About the reviewer: Gary Rowlands cut his teeth writing sketch comedy and was a commissioned writer on the hugely popular Spitting Image broadcast on national television in the UK. His contained horror Offline was the ‘featured script of the month’ in March and has since been optioned. He is seeking representation and can be contacted at gazrow at hotmail dot com.

About the writer, Rod Thompson: I have been writing creatively since I learned how to write. There is just something about telling a story that I can never get over. Storytelling in itself is like an old flame that occasionally comes to me and just says, “Use me.” The ability to watch a movie through words, or to craft a world in such a manner is the closest to Godliness that man will ever come. True story. Contact Rod at RodThompson1980 “AT” gmail.com

INTERESTED IN READING THIS ONE?

 CONTACT ROD AT RodThompson1980 “AT” gmail.com

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All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Teaching with Violence – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Teaching with Violence

In my day (warbles the ancient reviewer) horror was simple to classify. You had ghost stories. Creature features. And, of course, Slashers. Ah – the good ole days. * Now things have gotten more varied. Found footage. Torture porn of every shape and size. Hostel. Saw. Every Wayan’s spoof ever made (now that’s real torture, folks!) As a horror subgenre, sadism can be tricky. It’s easy to write. And very easy to get wrong. Audiences will inevitably cringe when characters are threatened. But one slip of the keys, and a psychologically effective script can easily descend into mindless sadism… usually tinged with misogyny. Teaching With Violence is one script that treads the thin line successfully. Yet doesn’t lose its shock value.

A simple premise, TWV follows bartender Sarah as she closes up for the night. Before leaving, waitress Emily drops off a cell phone left behind by a careless customer. She offers her friend a ride home – but Sarah’s waiting for her boyfriend. Left alone in the bar, Sarah idly browses the phone’s picture gallery – and finds horrifying photos. Next thing she knows, a man arrives at the door looking for the phone. Sarah lies and says it’s not there; but he spots the phone on the bar. And can easily guess what she saw. Sarah calls 911 – but the man’s already broken in… Will Sarah survive the ordeal that follows? What does the stranger want, anyway?

Straightforward and shot in one location, TWV lives up to its name. It’s violent. But it teaches a valuable lesson: that brutality can work in short films. When handled intelligently.

* Just to clarify… we’re talkin’ 80s here. Don’t put the STS staff in Depends yet. (Unless you’re kinky that way.)

About the writer: Our very own James Williams (IMDB credits here.) With both shorts and features to his name, James is perhaps best known for the So Pretty vampire trilogy of shorts – the third installment now in production!

Pages: 13

Budget: Very low budget.  Only two main characters, and two supporting characters (three, if you consider a boyfriend lying on a couch support.) Oh – and one setting. A bar.  Doesn’t get simpler than that.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

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All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Cooked – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Cooked

A this-or-that of urban legends as an old cat lady goes about her day. …

There’s something about mixing horror and comedy that just works so well.  You know, like Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups – mix chocolate and peanut butter (or is that peanut butter and chocolate?), and the result is better than any single ingredient.  Doubt me on that?  Try some of these titles on for size: Army of Darkness, Shaun of the Dead,  American Werewolf in London (in parts.).  ‘Nuff said.  Game, set and match.

Following in that noble of tradition of laughing at potentially grisly events, Cooked follows the story of little old lady Barbara, as she pulls into her driveway.  Her son Jacob has lent her the family cat for a day of fur-baby sitting – and Barbara’s thrilled.  But, as old people sometimes are (especially in films), Barbara can be a bit… absentminded.  As the script progresses, the feline dangers in house begin to mount.  An open microwave.  Upended knives in the sink.  Will Barbara be a good grand-mamma to little pussy?  Or is there a cat-astrophe in their future?

Give Cooked a read.  It’s a fun little script with a strong ending.  And hey…  any script that endangers a cat is fine with me.

About the writer: Chris Shamburger was a semi-finalist in the 2011 Shriekfest Film Festival and finalist (Top 10) in 2013 for his recently-produced script, Hiccups. He was a semi-finalist in the 2008 Straight Twisted Horror Screenplay Contest and has been published in Twisted Dreams Magazine and Horror in Words. He lives in Marietta, GA with his partner and their Chow-mix rescue, Walter. Aside from writing, Chris has been teaching pre-kindergarten for the past five years.

Pages: 4

Budget: Low budget ; the entire script takes place at a single house (interior and exterior shots.)  One character.  Two, if you count the cat.  Which  is probably the only tricky part.  But that’s what stuffed props are for!! Or housecats you no longer need…

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

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All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Zombie Chicken – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

ZOMBIE CHICKEN

Big brothers will always scare little brothers.  Even after a zombie apocalypse.

If you’ve ever had an older sibling, chances are you’ve been the target of a prank, a butt of a joke, or even be falsely accused of a crime you didn’t commit.  Big brothers and sisters will always have your back, but let’s face it, sometimes they can be real jerks.

Then, of course, there’s always urban legends specifically created to scare the crap out of unknowing, naïve little kids.  You know, the ones that sound almost too weird to be true, but will still keep you awake all night shaking under your covers.

Such is the tale of the Zombie Chicken.

Our story begins at Creek Farms.  Immediately, we know from the maximum security fences and guard towers that this is no ordinary idyllic rural landscape.  And soon afterwards, we discover this is no ordinary world. Indeed.

Two young boys, Oscar and Michael, gather eggs in the chicken coop while they discuss a disturbing story about a man accused of stealing food and being fed to — zombies.

Could this be true, or is it just a legend created to scare people straight?  Even if they doubt there’s any truth behind the story, Oscar and Michael aren’t brave enough to find out.

After their chores are finished, they encounter Michael’s younger brother Billy, and decide to scare him with their own urban legend about a hideous, undead creature known as the zombie chicken. Billy refuses to believe the older boys, but it’s too late – the seed has been planted in the young one’s impressionable brain.

Is the zombie chicken stalking Billy, waiting for a chance to peck him and turn him into one of the undead?  Or is Billy the gullible victim of his brother’s vindictiveness?

Author Phil Clarke Jr. captures the innocence of childhood in a dangerous world.  Even in the most deadly situations, kids will be kids. Even after the zombie apocalypse.

Zombie Chicken is that rare horror film which is both suitable for and stars pre-teens.  Directors who enjoy working with young actors and are fans of the horror genre have an opportunity  to  make a truly scary family film. Just think about how much this one could stand out – and keep your audiences talking!

Pages: 9

Budget: Small.  A stock shot of a prison.  A farm location complete with chickens.  And, of course, the dreaded zombie chicken.  Friends of guys like Rick Baker – should totally apply!

About the Guest Reviewer:  David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No. 2 pencil.  He’s a contributor and award winner on websites such as the late lamented MoviePoet.com, WriterArena.com, and this here one.

About the Author: Phil Clarke, Jr. is a contest winning writer who has had multiple feature films optioned.  Produced shorts of Phil’s have been featured at Cannes and Clermont Ferrand.  More of his work is available at his website: www.philclarkejr.com.  (IMDB Credits listed here.)

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

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All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Sweet Poison – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Sweet Poison

A jaded demon hunter sets out to trap the Incubus who killed the woman he loved…

“Humanity”. That’s such a simple word – describing a staggeringly complex reality.

Us humans are such fragile creatures. We need air to breath. Food to eat. Sex to continue our race and satisfy our desires – at least temporarily. The dominant species of Planet Earth, we’re perceived as masters of our world… at least on the surface. But what of the darker world that might exist below: gods, devils, angels and demons – supernatural entities poised to use our imperfect emotions and animal needs for their own nefarious needs. Drain our souls. Our life force. Spiritual food for pure evil.

In Matias Caruso’s “Sweet Poison”, we’re sucked off into the dank, desperate world of Logan. A noir demon-hunter by trade, the only affection in Logan’s life comes from his time with rent-an-hour prostitute Maxine. It’s hot and heavy – but to Logan, it feels real. At least until Maxine turns up dead.   The main suspect in her demise – a dream lurking demon who visited her after hours; draining her life force with every deadly thrust.

Bent on revenge (and cajoled by Maxine’s nervous co-workers) Logan sets off on his own tantric investigation to find the creature and bring it to justice. Discovering it to be gender and shape-shifting demon, Logan lures the now-Succubus to his bed, using his own body as the bait. Battling against his own unresolved carnal needs, Logan struggles to kill the monster… before it can claim him as it’s next victim.

Soft, slow and smooth like a Succubus, Sweet Poison pulls a reader in – teasing them with tempting shadows, and sweet drops of sin-stained story. Another gem in Caruso’s award-winning crown, Sweet Poison is a treat both for the reader and the screen. Tight dialogue and concise, flowing narratives – all combine into a beautifully disturbing story – rich in supernatural erotica.

And if that doesn’t sound like a festival winner… well, you haven’t read Matias yet!

Pages: 7

About the reviewer: I have been writing creatively since I learned how to write. There is just something about telling a story that I can never get over. Storytelling in itself is like an old flame that occasionally comes to me and just says, “Use me.” The ability to watch a movie through words, or to craft a world in such a manner is the closest to Godliness that man will ever come. True story. Contact Rod at RodThompson1980 “AT” gmail.com

About the writer: An optioned and award winning screenwriter, Matias Caruso has far too many accolades to name. So we’ll stick with just one: he’s the 2014 Grand Prize Winner of the International Page Awards Contest. Not to mention an all-around terrific guy. Interested in Matias’ work? Email him at matiascaruso32 “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

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All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Change of Heart – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Change of Heart

A desperate virgin’s excursion to a dive bar yields unexpected results.

Urban Legends. They’re part of our culture. Our collective memory. Stories that are told again and again – usually with a moralistic spin. Don’t shirk your babysitting duties for your boyfriend. Or park in Lover’s Lane. Or investigate that noise in the closet. And definitely never get drunk in dive bars and hit on total strangers…

Now THERE’S an urban legend that’s stood the test of time: the one about the guy who gets wasted, only to wake up the next morning with a nasty hangover, in a bath loaded with ice… and missing some body parts… Maybe it’s never really happened, but that’s some evil stuff right there. A creepy tale that’s even inspired a notable Korean horror film, “Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance.”

It’s a scenario that inspired writer Eric Wall as well – and he’s taken it to some surprising (and delightful) places…

Meet protagonist Dennis. A sad-sack waste of a man. 37 years old. A virgin. Recently diagnosed with a heart defect. The fates haven’t been kind to poor Dennis – and it’s about to get far worse. When we meet poor D, he’s slumped in a seedy bar propositioning every female in sight. You see, Dennis is determined to get laid. Resolving at least one problem. Unfortunately for Dennis, his pickup lines stink on ice. As do his chances tonight…

At least until Tracy – an attractive vamp – slinks in the door. Sidling up to the bar and Dennis’ side, Tracy strikes up a conversation. And – as phenomenally unlikely as it seems – she seems to be attracted to him. A drink and some idle banter later, and Tracey agrees to take Dennis to a hotel room. Needless to say, she’s got a few ulterior motives in mind…

A straightforward, gory scenario – at least in SOME writer’s hands. But Change of Heart has surprises in store. Not to mention – heartfelt laughs. Witty and intelligent, Change has some amazing one liners. Not to mention amazingly fleshed out and sympathetic characters – in an eight page horror script, no less! You like dark comedy? Then give Change of Heart a try. It twists your expectations in delightful ways… all the way to its frosty end!

Pages: 8

Budget: Relatively low – locations include a low rent bar and a cheap hotel bathroom.

About the writer: Eric Wall is a New Jersey based screenwriter who has written several short scripts, two features and is at work on multiple TV specs. He can be reached at e_wall1498 “AT” yahoo!

His previous STS submission, Family Trip, is currently a Quarter-Finalist in the BlueCat Short Screenplay Competition. A spectacular drama (and currently available), the script and review are available here:

Family Trip

A poor Texas family loads up their camping gear for a weekend trip, but one of them will not be returning.

About the guest reviewer: Anthony Cawood is an aspiring screenwriter from the UK with a number of scripts in various stages of production, two of which have just wrapped shooting. His script, A Certain Romance, recently won in the Nashville Film Festival Screenwriting Competition (short script category). You can find out more at http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

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All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

 

Along the Roadside – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Along the Roadside

A murderous drifter meets his match along a desolate stretch of rural road.

Gotta love any script that manages to intertwine a geriatric crocheting in the back seat of a sedan with serial killer butcherings…

Which is exactly what Along the Roadside, from Brian Wind, manages to great comedic effect. Of course that’s comedy as black as the La Brea Tar Pits!

Let’s join sweet old couple Parker and Taylor as they take a leisurely drive down a rural road. A figure in the distance waves them down, so they stop to offer the stranger a lift. That lonely figure is Yancy – the kind of hitcher the geriatric couple should leave stranded at the curbside, choking on their diesel dust. But hey – they’re old, naive and trusting. Just what Yancy’s counting on.

Did I mention that Yancy kills people who pick him up? Yep – that’s his standard M.O.

In fact, he mentions that detail to his over friendly benefactors, who seem to take it far too well (beyond a Waltons-esque exclamation or two). Even Yancy is puzzled. For awhile.

You can probably work out the twist by now. Or at least part of it. But there’s an Easter egg or two in this one, pertaining to Taylor’s name…

A great example of less being more, Along the Roadside packs a hell of a lot into five pages and limited characters. With an overload of dark humor.

About the writer: Brian Wind can be contacted at bwind22 “at” yahoo!

Pages: 5

Budget: A very affordable shoot: limited location – small cast. We’ve only got one warning: budget for a quick trip to the grocery store…

About the reviewer: Anthony Cawood is an award winning screenwriter from the UK with four shorts produced, two in post production and another 10 short scripts optioned/sold. You can find out more at http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.