Fabric – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Fabric

“A newly hired accountant searches through a village balance sheet to weed out inefficiencies. But is cutting corners always wise?”

Anticipation; it’s an experience vital for any script reader. Not to mention film audiences everywhere. Want to experience that tingly, edge-of-your-seat sensation?

Then crack open a script. And stop. Page One.

There it is. Can you feel it?

Before reading a single paragraph – anticipation’s the emotion you crave. That foreboding sense of things to come; the ebb and flow of narrative.

Now, imagine sitting in the theater. The lights dim; your dreams and hopes soon to appear. I hope this movie’s really good. You focus attention on the screen. And before you know it, the story grabs you by your very soul. Anticipation rules the day. Your sense of wonder; riveted. What’s going to happen next? That’s the best question of them all. What a captivating feeling!

The undercurrent of Anthony Cawood’s script Fabric, Anticipation is a gift to any script reader. One that keeps on giving.

The hero of our story: Jeremy Saunders – a newbie 20-something accountant, hired by a tiny village to audit its stumbling finances. When we first meet him, nebbish Jeremy’s hard at work at his PC – scrutinizing questionable payroll activity. The suspicious sum: “twenty thousand pounds a year” – an exorbitant amount being paid to some local man named Pater. And Pater’s “services” are suspect: winding the one and only church clock in town. One single time. Every day.

Though he presents his findings, Jeremy finds his concerns rebuffed by superiors: Pater provides an “essential service”, Old Man Gutherie claims. That of ‘clock winder’? How can this be? Unsatisfied by Gutherie’s dismissal, Jeremy’s bean-counter mind rebels. So he strikes off to tour the village, interviewing reluctant town folk everywhere. His mission: to uncover the suspected scam – in search of ‘truth’ and ‘clarity’.

As they say – game on.

As the day winds towards a close, Jeremy’s quest for Pater widens. Eventually, he tracks the elusive man down – meeting Pater at his very door.

And so, the mystery is laid bare. Who truly is Pater? Does he exist? And what do his “services” actually mean? A delicious underdog fantasy, Fabric weaves anticipation into a lyrical tale. One filled with wonder, and a pevertedly satisfying moral twist: “Be careful what you wish for. Pursue one’s questions, if you dare…”

Are you a director with imagination? Then give fairy-tale Fabric a whirl. Anticipation is a beautiful ingredient. One that will fill your audience’s hearts. Not to mention, the silver screen.

Pages: 16

Budget: A small challenge, due to the rural setting. You’ll need some creativity to pull this one off, but the story is so worth it. 😀

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working on a historical feature.

About the Writer, Anthony Cawood: I’m an award winning screenwriter from the UK with over 15 scripts produced, optioned and/or purchased. Outside of my screenwriting career, I’m also a published short story writer and movie reviewer. Links to my films and details of my scripts can be found at: www.anthonycawood.co.uk

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

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All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sweet Poison – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Sweet Poison

A jaded demon hunter sets out to trap the Incubus who killed the woman he loved…

“Humanity”. That’s such a simple word – describing a staggeringly complex reality.

Us humans are such fragile creatures. We need air to breath. Food to eat. Sex to continue our race and satisfy our desires – at least temporarily. The dominant species of Planet Earth, we’re perceived as masters of our world… at least on the surface. But what of the darker world that might exist below: gods, devils, angels and demons – supernatural entities poised to use our imperfect emotions and animal needs for their own nefarious needs. Drain our souls. Our life force. Spiritual food for pure evil.

In Matias Caruso’s “Sweet Poison”, we’re sucked off into the dank, desperate world of Logan. A noir demon-hunter by trade, the only affection in Logan’s life comes from his time with rent-an-hour prostitute Maxine. It’s hot and heavy – but to Logan, it feels real. At least until Maxine turns up dead.   The main suspect in her demise – a dream lurking demon who visited her after hours; draining her life force with every deadly thrust.

Bent on revenge (and cajoled by Maxine’s nervous co-workers) Logan sets off on his own tantric investigation to find the creature and bring it to justice. Discovering it to be gender and shape-shifting demon, Logan lures the now-Succubus to his bed, using his own body as the bait. Battling against his own unresolved carnal needs, Logan struggles to kill the monster… before it can claim him as it’s next victim.

Soft, slow and smooth like a Succubus, Sweet Poison pulls a reader in – teasing them with tempting shadows, and sweet drops of sin-stained story. Another gem in Caruso’s award-winning crown, Sweet Poison is a treat both for the reader and the screen. Tight dialogue and concise, flowing narratives – all combine into a beautifully disturbing story – rich in supernatural erotica.

And if that doesn’t sound like a festival winner… well, you haven’t read Matias yet!

Pages: 7

About the reviewer: I have been writing creatively since I learned how to write. There is just something about telling a story that I can never get over. Storytelling in itself is like an old flame that occasionally comes to me and just says, “Use me.” The ability to watch a movie through words, or to craft a world in such a manner is the closest to Godliness that man will ever come. True story. Contact Rod at RodThompson1980 “AT” gmail.com

About the writer: An optioned and award winning screenwriter, Matias Caruso has far too many accolades to name. So we’ll stick with just one: he’s the 2014 Grand Prize Winner of the International Page Awards Contest. Not to mention an all-around terrific guy. Interested in Matias’ work? Email him at matiascaruso32 “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

The Gifted Photographer – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

THE GIFTED PHOTOGRAPHER

A photographer pays a house-call to shoot a family portrait where his true talent becomes apparent.

Photographs, those treasured mementos of our lives – they can chart a life from birth through to adulthood, and beyond. We keep photos in our wallets, in lockets around our necks, in photo-frames by our bedside tables. Photographs allow us to freeze moments – to travel back in time.

The Gifted Photographer is set towards the end of the Victorian era. At first glance it conjures Great Britain, but America had its own Gilded Age, most notably in the regions of New England and the Deep South. Think Gothic Architecture, the Women’s Suffragette Movement, Republican domination, and literary greats such as Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mark Twain. This was also a period characterized by high society and strict morality.

Ian J. Courter manages beautifully to evoke the images of the time – the cobblestone streets, horse drawn carriages and top-hats.

Photography at this time was in its infancy – there was no such thing as the ‘Selfie’ and no such thing as Instagram or Snapchat. The taking of photographs, in particular portraits, was only ever done for special occasions.

The story opens on Michael Houtman, the titular photographer of the piece. Herbert and Margaret Jaffe have requested his services for a very special family portrait with their daughter, Linda. Michael strikes up a conversation with Linda and discovers this sweet young woman suffered a nasty spill on the ice a few months ago. The accident has left her sickly and confined to a wheelchair, but this morning she wakes to a perfect Spring day feeling better than she has in a long time – and she’s ready for her close-up.

But this is no ordinary day, no ordinary photo-shoot, and no ordinary photographer…

Far be it for me to shed too much light, or bring into focus the darker themes and rich cultural history explored in The Gifted Photographer, suffice to say the Latin phrases Ars moriendi and Memento mori both give clues into a not so well known practice explored in this unique tale.

Of course, all you have to do to find out more is read the script. You’ll not only discover the secret talent The Gifted Photographer possesses, but will also uncover the talent of writer Ian J. Courter.  

With an ending that will stay with you long after the lights come up (we recommend reading it at night) and a final sting in the tail you won’t see coming, we advise you to get The Gifted Photographer in the can quick as a flash, before somebody else snaps it up.

Pages: 8

Budget: A little will be needed to make this one period.  But given what you get in the return, it’s definitely worth it!

About the guest reviewer: Libby Chambers has been writing all her life. Over her career, she’s worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, trained as a FAD, and served professionally as a freelance web-content editor and proofreader. She lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia, and describes him as being both a good and a bad influence on her writing. You can contact Libby at libbych “AT” hotmail

About the writer: Ian J. Courter has an academic and technical-writing background, and is published in both fields, so a shift to another form of writing seemed natural. He strives to combine his writing skills with nearly two decades of military experience to develop screenplays with vivid locations and in-depth, realistic characters. What started as a hobby quickly became a passion.  In only a few short years, he has written three feature-length screenplays and nine short scripts.  He currently has several feature-length scripts in various stages of development and continually seeks inspiration for more. His email address is ian.j.courter “at” gmail.com.

 READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

Like a Moth to a Flame – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Like a Moth to a Flame

A woman attempts to exorcise her lost lover. But is his pull too powerful to wish away?

Love, they say, is a flame. Passionate. Unstoppable. Consuming everything in its wake. That type of love can drive one to irrational, insane acts. Commit unspeakable crimes in its name.

Nadia’s flame is Jack.

Her love for Jack blots out all else. Reason. Proportion. Even reality.

Alone in her dark apartment, Nadia obsesses over the lost love of her life. Though the holes in her memory blot out certain things, other visions refuse to go away. The miserable existence she’s led since he’s been gone. The drastic measures she’s taken to kill the pain. Shopping. Eating. Cutting her arms with razors.

At her wit’s end, Nadia finally summons “Mr. K.” – a mysterious shaman wearing rings made of bone, a man she believes can make the pain go away.

Is it a hallucination? Or black magic? And does that even matter, if the pain itself is real? But can Mr. K. do anything to end Nadia’s suffering; save her from the misery?

A terrifying psychological fantasy ripped from the imagination of master writer Matias Caruso, Like a Moth to the Flame explores multiple dark themes: rationalization, addiction. The void left behind when one’s cut off from the object of their desire.

It’s a low budget masterpiece with frightening visuals. Give Moth a read – it’ll suck you in, and burn your wings.

Pages: 11

Budget: Low budget – a cast of two, in a single apartment – lit by the static of a television set. And leave room for a great costumer designer. Mr. K deserves some fashionable threads!

About the guest reviewer: Pete Barry is an award-winning screenwriter, playwright, actor, director and musician. His short plays have been published in numerous collections. He’s also a cofounder of the Porch Room, a film and theater production company, website available at http://www.porchroom.com/.  Please feel free to reach out to him with script requests at petebarry27 “AT” Hotmail.

About the writer: An optioned and award winning screenwriter, Matias Caruso has far too many accolades to name. So we’ll stick with just one: he’s the 2014 Grand Prize Winner of the International Page Awards Contest. Not to mention an all-around terrific guy. Interested in Matias’ work? Email him at matiascaruso32 “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

 

The End of the Affair – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

The End of the Affair
Everyone’s replaceable. Aren’t they?

It’s true, breaking up is hard to do.

Sometimes, it feels like the end of everything. As if your beloved were the only thing keeping the entire world safe.

And then there’s the inescapable guilt. Was I to blame? Or were they?

In Tim Westland’s micro-short End of the Affair, an old woman runs after a much younger man down 5th Avenue in NYC – accusing him of betraying his promise to “always be there”.

Deep down, the man knows he IS at fault. When pushed for answers, he admits he wasn’t what she was looking for. What humanity was looking for, either.

Because he’s not just breaking up with a person. He’s breaking up with a planet, too.

Who is he? He’s Mr. Readthescripttofindout!
‘Cause this twist’s out of this world!

Pages: 2

Budget: Very minor. All you need is an urban setting, and a few well cast actors.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the Writer, Tim Westland: Co-writer of the acclaimed graphic novel Chasing the Dead, Tim’s an outstanding writer with an eye for the detail. When not subsumed in writing throes, he can be reached timwestland “AT” hotmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Fair’s Fare – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

Fair’s Fare
An unsavory mechanic cuts a corner that won’t cost him his life.
But, by golly, he just might wish it had.

We all cut corners in life.

From leaving an “unimportant” ingredient out of a recipe, to filling out a tax return with “guesstimates” – who doesn’t play fast and loose with the “rules”?

When we shortcut labor intensive processes, there’s no real harm done… right?

Well, not in Steven Clark’s Fair’s Fare – a short that demonstrates how secretly skimping on something can have dramatic consequences…in a hilariously unique way.

Here’s the premise – one that sadly might resonate:

Auto mechanic Guy thinks he can do minimal work for maximum pay.

One fateful afternoon, veteran taxi driver Floyd enters Guy’s shop and requests an oil change for his beloved cab Becky. According to Floyd, he’s “been with her” longer than Guy’s been alive. So that’s the only fair way to treat his ride.

Floyd departs, giving Guy half an hour to work on the car.

Turns out, Guy only needs 30 seconds to finish the job. Certain Floyd’s a sucker, Guy only pours a quart of oil into the engine: the most expensive quart of oil ever at $37.50.

And that’s his first mistake.

Because when Guy enters Becky to start up the engine, he quickly discovers she’s got a mind of her own. And just like femme fatales from classic Hollywood, Becky’s initial seduction turns into something far more sinister.

As Guy will soon learn, a dirty, un-oiled engine is a force to be reckoned with. By the time Becky’s finished with him, Guy’s the one who needs a clean-up.

And an explanation when Floyd returns…

Want an everyday story with an otherworldly twist that’ll have audiences laughing themselves almost to death? Then Fair’s Fare’s for you!

Becky’s awaiting. And she won’t be denied. So hop in for a hilariously wild ride!

Pages: 9

Budget: Moderate. You’ll need a cab and some actors with terrific comic timing, of course!

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: Writing since the age of 12, the first book that Steve Clark ever read was Amityville Horror. The second was Cujo. He’s been writing ever since, and is currently hard at work on two features. He’s reachable at SAClark69 “AT” verizon.net!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Pinnochio: A Nose for the Flesh – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

Pinocchio: A Nose for Flesh
Pinocchio is back. But this time he’s bad, really bad.

Honesty. Hard work. Achieving one’s deepest dreams.

In most people’s childhood memories, Pinocchio is a comforting tale about how Bad can be turned to Good. How a person may reach their goals if they keep their nose to the grindstone and do right by others in their world. Disney’s 1940 variation of the 19th century Italian fairy tale definitely presented a feel-good version, with Pinocchio’s character arc echoing hope for individual success in post-depression USA.

But James Barron’s Pinocchio: A Nose for Flesh offers up a very different version of the human wannabe and his progenitor, Geppetto. Set in a rural Italian home in the late nineteenth century, this variant is a story of religious fanaticism, unequal gender roles, infantile male rages, and terrifying violence.

The story begins as many of us probably remember. Geppetto creates a wooden figure that he imbues with life and calls his son. Pinocchio begins his life good, polite, and grateful for the opportunity to embrace Geppetto’s family as his own.

As for the old man himself – he’s convinced his creation is divine, a gift from God. But his daughters fear otherwise, and beg their father to consult a priest.

Geppetto ignores his daughters’ pleas, and soon loses interest in his new work. He’s repulsed by the sight of Pinocchio’s growing nose, and irritated by the boy’s polite insistence that he receive the attentions that any real boy deserves:

PINOCCHIO
Father, have I offended thee—

GEPPETTO
(turns to Elisa)
Make it stop speaking to me.

Pinocchio practically vibrates with shame and anger.

PINOCCHIO
I… don’t understand.

GEPPETTO
Cast your glance elsewhere, beast!

When sent from the cottage to collect firewood, Pinocchio’s short-lived happiness rapidly transforms into something much more sinister. He’s determined to return to Geppetto as the real boy that his maker once envisioned. No matter what it takes.

But, if Pinocchio’s petulance persists, he could destroy the very fabric of the life he so craves.

If you’re looking for a very dark rendition of this beloved tale…one where “happily ever after” is not an option, look no further than this work. Pinocchio: A Nose for Flesh is your dark and twisted cup of tea!

Number of pages: 11

Budget: Moderate.

About the reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing. She may be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail.

About the writer: James Barron excels in comedy writing. Every so often the horror/thriller muse hits him–and when it does, watch out for that punch! His work is frequently highlighted on Shooting the Shorts. Mr. Barron can be reached at: https://www.scriptrevolution.com/profiles/james-barron/contact

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.