The Changer – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

The Changer

Two bickering police detectives must find a way to capture the world’s most elusive criminal.

Some stories are tons of fun. Isn’t that what we go to movies for?

Angst, terror and philosophical symbolism isn’t needed for every film we see. Sometimes simple is the best. “Entertainment for the sake of entertainment” is a spectacular experience when done right. Especially when the jokes are primed to fly.

In his latest short The Changer, master storyteller David Troop makes a fun story live and breathe; resulting in chuckles galore!

Yet, for cops Kennedy and Harris, the events of The Changer are pure business. As often happens with film law enforcement types, these partners are different as two guys could be:

Kennedy’s a Caucasian veteran cop in his 40s – lacking any form of fashion sense. Of course, film-logic requires him paired with African-American Officer Harris. Ten years Kennedy’s junior, Harris is a “poster boy for Reebok.” Together, the two are on the job, seeking a mysterious master-of-disguise known simply as, “The Changer.

Tense and bickering from Page One, the couple track “the dude” to urban apartment 4D. With police badges on display, they bust down the door – only to find screaming hooker Petunia inside. Encouraged by the officer’s raised guns, Petunia points to the bathroom. Harris searches the area quickly, yet finds only – a cat inside.

Harris shrugs, turns his back. Allowing the Bizarre “Changer” to make his escape. Out the open bathroom window – down a rusty fire escape. Pretty soon, the chase is on (ala the Grand Budapest Hotel!

In hot pursuit of a “tall figure in a trench coat”, the partners race through alleys, down gritty streets. Eventually, Harris corners the perp. (Kennedy joins the chase somewhat late… having stopped to “question” the hooker privately!). But soon, Kennedy and Harris have their man…

Still – given The Changer’s “special set of skills”, the question is… Do they have him cornered?

Really?

Tongue planted firmly in cheek, TC is a fun – and very funny – ride.

Think movies like Ghostbusters, Back to the Future, Police Academy, Naked Gun or Groundhog Day. If you’re a director who loves goofy comedy, then TC is your blockbuster. Set your humor on stun. And pull the cinematic wool over your audience’s tears-of-laughter-filled eyes!

Pages: 9

Budget: Relatively low. Three talented male character actors (with good comedic timing) are required for the main roles. Plus a handful of extras. Settings include: Apartment interior rooms, stairway, streets, and an alley – all of which are easy to stage.

About the Reviewer: California über reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working on a historical feature.

About the Writer: David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No. 2 pencil.  He’s a contributor and award winner on websites such as MoviePoet.com, WriterArena.com, and this here one.

 READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

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Cooked – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Cooked

A this-or-that of urban legends as an old cat lady goes about her day. …

There’s something about mixing horror and comedy that just works so well.  You know, like Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups – mix chocolate and peanut butter (or is that peanut butter and chocolate?), and the result is better than any single ingredient.  Doubt me on that?  Try some of these titles on for size: Army of Darkness, Shaun of the Dead,  American Werewolf in London (in parts.).  ‘Nuff said.  Game, set and match.

Following in that noble of tradition of laughing at potentially grisly events, Cooked follows the story of little old lady Barbara, as she pulls into her driveway.  Her son Jacob has lent her the family cat for a day of fur-baby sitting – and Barbara’s thrilled.  But, as old people sometimes are (especially in films), Barbara can be a bit… absentminded.  As the script progresses, the feline dangers in house begin to mount.  An open microwave.  Upended knives in the sink.  Will Barbara be a good grand-mamma to little pussy?  Or is there a cat-astrophe in their future?

Give Cooked a read.  It’s a fun little script with a strong ending.  And hey…  any script that endangers a cat is fine with me.

About the writer: Chris Shamburger was a semi-finalist in the 2011 Shriekfest Film Festival and finalist (Top 10) in 2013 for his recently-produced script, Hiccups. He was a semi-finalist in the 2008 Straight Twisted Horror Screenplay Contest and has been published in Twisted Dreams Magazine and Horror in Words. He lives in Marietta, GA with his partner and their Chow-mix rescue, Walter. Aside from writing, Chris has been teaching pre-kindergarten for the past five years.

Pages: 4

Budget: Low budget ; the entire script takes place at a single house (interior and exterior shots.)  One character.  Two, if you count the cat.  Which  is probably the only tricky part.  But that’s what stuffed props are for!! Or housecats you no longer need…

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

El Paso Loco Luchadoras – Short Script Review

El Paso Loco Luchadoras

When they impersonate a notorious female gang during a convenience store robbery, two wannabe crooks must face-off with the very legends they are trying to imitate.

When it comes to the world of professional Mexican wrestling, the question burns:

Real? Or fake?

Fans of that star struck industry love their entertainment – and their guilty pleasures. Known far and wide for their extravagant characters and costumes, professional wrestlers fascinate viewers with their physical prowess – and their theatrical performances as well.

In recent decades, Mexican wrestlers- Luchadores– have extended the dramatic quality of the sport to great heights. The most notable example was Super Barrio’s run for U.S. president in 1996, when he held mock rallies in the United States and Mexico. The Luchador’s persona became a real-life superhero candidate – complete with a genuine platform, and campaign.

In his pivotal crime-comedy El Paso Loco Luchadoras, CJ Walley celebrates the power of such larger than life identities… replete with a female centric Pulp Fiction bent.

The protagonists of our story: Felix and Maria. Down and desperate for cash, we meet the two young women as they set out to rob a store. Rank amateurs in the world of crime, the two impersonate a gang of female wrestler thieves – a notorious band of bandits known as Los Locas Luchadoras. But when the real Luchadora’s show up, the duo’s fumbling plans are doomed to fail. Stitched together by CJ Walley’s masterful narrative skills, El Paso evolves into a dance of identity and role reversals; girrrrrl power  chemistry and comedy melt into Walley’s subtle story-telling blend – leaving the audience in stitches!

Are you a fan of Quentin Tarantino? And what about comic crime narrative – imbued with feminist poetic justice? Than grab onto El Paso with a flying headlock. Don’t let this dramatic gem slip away!

Number of Pages: 7

Budget: Low to medium. The main cost will be the luchadora costumes for 6 actors.

About the reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She recently has begun work on two screenplays.

About the writer: I began writing in 2012 and I’m pleased to say it’s been very exciting so far. I have been fortunate enough to have a short produced by a director in London and Amazon Studios have spotlighted one of my features as a notable project. My scripts place within the top 10% of various major screenwriting competitions and, as I continue to write new specs, I am remotely collaborating with a producers, directors, and actors in LA, NYC, New Orleans, Atlanta, Washington DC, Zurich, Amsterdam, Sydney, and Dallas while occasionally blogging for Stage 32.  If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, then I’d love to join forces with you whatever the scale, do not hesitate to reach out and drop me a line. (CJ “AT” CJwalley DOT COM; http://www.cjwalley.com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

Baby Steps – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Baby Steps

You never forget the first time you fall in love – even if you were in diapers.

Okay, we’ll admit that talking baby scripts aren’t always the best thing since sliced bread.  Case in point: the Look Who’s Talking Series, from One through…well, whenever they decided to finally stop torturing the movie going public.  Honestly – after the first fifteen rounds, baby poop jokes get kinda…stale.  To put it mildly.  (Even if poop itself continues to be funny to those of us with a case of arrested development.)

But occasionally, a script comes along that proves the exception to the rule.  A script with a gentle sense of humor, and heart.  Baby Steps is that exception.

This short follows the story of Millie and Hank – two babies that meet cute one day in the park; only to have their chance encounter and hopes dashed to smithereens when their mothers roll them away.  Their baby hearts are broken – never to meet again.  Or will they?  (Cue the dramatic music here.)

Folks, this one’s an honestly cute and intelligent romance.  Not to mention an easy shoot – baby wrangling and spit-up aside.  Give this short a shot… and make your audience feel young at heart.

About the writer: David M Troop resumed writing in 2011 after a twenty-five year hiatus.  Since then, he has written about 50 short scripts, two of which have been produced.   Dave would like to make it three.  He is a regular, award-winning contributor to MoviePoet.com.  Born on the mean streets of Reading, PA, Dave now resides in Schuylkill Haven with his wife Jodi and their two lazy dogs Max and Mattie.

Pages: 9

Budget: Very low.  Well, with the exception of dealing with baby actors.  Unless your friends have a few that can be borrowed…

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

The Battle of the Ice Cream Trucks: Short Script Available for Production!

The Battle of the Ice Cream Trucks: A Tale of Ire and Ice

It’s blood and sprinkles when two rival ice cream vendors go to war over a coveted street corner.

He’s known by many names. The Good Humor Man. Mr. Softee. Captain Cone. Mr. Tinkles.

No, it’s not Donald Trump. I am referring, of course, to the hero of children everywhere. The man who could turn a hot, sweltering summer afternoon into a delightful day of cho-chos and chocolate syrup. The ice cream man.

I have so many fond memories of standing in line behind the hot, diesel exhaust fumes with a crumpled up dollar in my hand, waiting for my chance to order my favorite ice cream treat. Just the sound of that music box like melody droning over and over from a block away could stop a game of street dodge ball in mid dodge, and send my friends and me back to our homes in a frenzied search for spare change.

The Battle of the Ice Cream Trucks : A Tale of Ire and Ice magically transports me back in time to those days of innocence – but with a demented, Brooklyn twist that is screenwriter J.E. Clarke’s trademark.

Josh, a young entrepreneur, operates an ice cream truck for Kidz and Conez. He’s a total pro: kind and courteous to his customers, truly loves his work, and the neighborhood children see him as an ice cream god. All is wonderful in banana boat land until one day…

Rick, another young entrepreneur, who operates an ice cream truck for Cool N’ Tastee pulls up to the same street corner with rock music blasting. But Rick is neither kind nor courteous. He’s nothing at all like Josh – in fact, he is the Anti-Josh.

Rick quickly infringes on Josh’s territory and his customers. Josh calmly explains that his is the only ice cream truck zoned for this street and politely asks Rick to leave. Rick responds with a not so polite gesture.

The Battle of the Ice Cream Trucks has now officially begun.

Josh and Rick engage in a war of sundae-making one-upmanship. A steel cage match with four layer cones, whip cream towers, and cookie dough delights. A literal Dessert Hunger Games.

When the day is finally over, and the last cherry is placed atop the last chocolate-dipped cone, neither Josh nor Rick are willing to concede. Both combatants are here for the long haul. And things in the once innocent and clean banana boat land are going to get very dirty indeed!

The Ice Cream Truck Wars is a dark comedy which tarnishes our childhood memories much in the same way Bad Santa destroyed the sanctity of Christmas. But in a good way. Screenwriter J.E. Clarke pulls out all the stops and leaves no cone unturned.

Directors who prefer their comedy (like their ice cream) a little twisted, should definitely enjoy this tale of ire and ice, and respond before the opportunity melts away.

Pages: 8

Budget: Medium plus. If you have access to two professional ice cream trucks, you’re pretty golden. You may be able to rent some off-season for a rigorous day of shooting. Or even stock footage and creative camera angles may pull it off. The main cast is small, with a group of adult and child extras. And there is the matter of many delicious props. And some props of a more adult nature.

About the Reviewer: David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No. 2 pencil. His short scripts have been featured on MoviePoet.com, Simplyscripts, and this here one. Currently, Dave is writing this review, but plans to write feature films in the near future and take Hollywood by storm. Well, not really storm – more like a sprinkle. He lives in the comatose town of Schuylkill Haven, PA where he is a proud grandfather, a father of two, and a husband of one.

About the author: Known for her unique characters and plots, J.E. Clarke has placed QF and SF for feature lengths in Page, and has two feature length films optioned for 2016/2017: limited location horror “Containment.” and SF feature “Stream of Consciousness.” More of Ms. Clarke’s work can be read at http://www.philclarkejr.com/jec.html. Ms. Clarke can be reached directly at janetgoodman “at” yahoo.

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Give Me a Break – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

GIVE ME A BREAK

Ten year old Michael comes up with an idea to get his bike back from the thieving hands of Wes; the neighborhood bully.

Whatever happens to good old short stories (or scripts) that gave the reader/viewer a fun n’ quirky slice of life? They seem to be in short supply these days: bumped to the side in favor of vampire and zombie flicks… and comedies that focus on wacky scenarios and bawdy sex antics. (Not that there’s anything wrong with those, mind you.)

Well, here’s a blast from the past.  A fun, straightforward story of a few innocent kids picked on by the neighborhood bully… and the ten year old who hatches a plan to stop the lunk in his tracks.  The script’s simple, fun and short – with a neat twist. Give this one a read, and consider it for your next project. It’s sure to leave you with happy viewers, who will remember this short long after the credits roll.

About the writer: Matthew Dressel recently wrote/produced/acted in his own web series Let’s Kill John Stamos! One of his feature films, Killing Daniel, has been optioned by Darius Films. You can catch more of Matt’s work at www.matthewdressel.com.

Pages: 7

Budget: Pretty micro.  All that’s needed are a few child actors (though we all know how difficult they can be!)

WANT TO READ THE SCRIPT?  CONTACT MATT AT WWW.MATTHEWDRESSEL.COM!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Fully Insured – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Fully Insured

In the future, insurance covers almost every facet of life: home, auto and… heartbreak. But what happens when you’re not Fully Insured?

Ah, young love. So perfect. So pure. So full of hope. And so… utterly destined to fail?

Well, far be it from us to sound the clarion fart in church. But when it comes to reality, the cold fact is that numbers don’t lie. According to some generic poster we referenced on Yahoo.com*, the average relationship lasts six months. And 50% of marriages end in divorce. (Mind you, that’s the lucky few that make it to the altar at all!) But such are the viscitudes of life. We make our choices. And hope for the best.

Of course, smart people get insurance.

After all, it’s only logical. In today’s complicated world, you can buy insurance for everything. Houses. Cars. Pets. Medical needs up to and including the old wazoo. Insurance companies pay for surgeons to mend the physical holes in our hearts. So why not the emotional ones, as well?

Writer Mitch Smith contemplates that very question in his script, Insured… through the eyes of his young protagonist, Alex. You see, Alex and girlfriend Hannah are in love. That annoying, deep forever kind. So when Alex’s metal-head roommate Blake recommends relationship insurance to his pal, Alex is quite sold on the idea. It’s worse than a prenup, the lad exclaims. It’s betting on your relationship to fail!

But sadly – most relationships do. Will Alex n’ Hannah prove to the exception to the rule? Or is our young paramour about to learn the hardest lesson of all: that even when love is on the line, deductibles still apply. And wise men hedge their bets. Even when it comes to Love.

Funny and wry, Insured is a simple shoot – two main characters, and a handful of apartment/office settings. Plus, it’s a theme that never gets old: humor and relationships? How can a short with such ingredients fail?

* Dude, cut us some slack. We’re fiction writers at STS. Not sociological research geeks!

Pages: 8

Budget: Moderate. A handful of actors, and simply settings!

About the writer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts) offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts “AT” gmail and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.