Under the Oaks

Two Civil War soldiers, one Union, the other Confederate, confront each other during the Battle of Appomattox.

Different shorts have different purposes.  Some are meant to shock.  Others are meant to explore a theme: a political issue, a moral quandary – or any one of a million ‘what if’ scenarios that can be dreamed up by the creative mind.  Then there are scripts that are a little simpler – just a slice of human life and emotion.  With the right director, and actors – sometimes those are the most effective.

Here for your consideration is Under the Oaks – a quiet little piece about two soldiers from opposite sides of the Civil War fence.  Facing mortality; together.  Nothing much is needed in the way of FX. A bit of gunfire sound effects, two Civil War costumes – and two actors that can really command a scene.

About the Writer: Living in CA, Ryan Lee can be contacted via ryanlee1800 AT yahoo. His IMDB credits can be viewed here.

Expected Budget: Minimal

Primary Genre: Drama

Page Length: Four

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Deal of a Lifetime
Some old cars are hidden treasures… aren’t they?

In today’s world, the adage “If it sounds to good to be true, it probably is” is more relevant than ever. We’ve all received those amusing emails from Nigerian princes and accidentally clicked on those adverts offering us a way to get a beach body in 4 weeks days seconds.

But how many of you have asked for $10,000 for a rusty Corolla worth $400 max… and shockingly find it accepted?

Carl, the proprietor of Carl’s Cars and main character in Deal of a Lifetime, has done just that; successfully offloading the junker to young and apparently street smart Rodrigo.

Carl should be laughing all the way to the bank, right?

Well, he isn’t. You see, before Rodrigo arrived, another man, Gabriel, thought $2,000 was an absolute bargain for that hunk of junk, and left the dealership to get the needed cash.

So when Rodrigo grins with delight at the prospect of forking out $10,000, Carl begins to suspect foul play. Or some sort of scam.

However, he soon learns that his humble Corolla hides a priceless secret within its unappealing exterior. A secret so incredible that the potential buyers are willing to exchange something far more valuable than money for access to the vehicle.

In fact, their very lives…

Featuring a unique concept and amusing – yet thought provoking – dialogue, a Deal of a Lifetime is just what you’ll have on your hands if you scoop this script up, and drive it off the lot!

Pages: 12

Budget: Not bad at all. Borrow a junker Corolla, and you’re pretty much set.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the Writer: Recently discovered by STS (but already treasured), James can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

What can we say? We love it when a plan (and a script/production match) comes together.

In this case, the honors go to Ammar Salmi, whose SF “thinker script” – Quality Control has been produced by Tin Mirror Productions! (http://www.tinmirrorproductions.com)

Not only that, but TWO premieres of QC are right around the bend, at the following locations:

1. November 4, 2016
Location: The Creative House, in Long Island, NY – Event Brite tickets available here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/quality-control-premiere-long-island-short-film-the-creative-house-tickets-27475292339?aff=erelpanelorg

2. November 6, 2016
Location: Metropolitan Room; known as the best cabaret in NYC with a dinner-theatre type atmosphere.
http://metropolitanroom.com/ event.cfm?id=248147

About the Author: Born and raised in Bir El Ater, Algeria, Ammar Salmi majored in computer science at USTHB university. He found interest in screenwriting when he was 19 – falling in love with it only two years after reading “The usual suspect” script. Ever since, he’s been learning, reading, and writing (his words). Ammar’s gearing up for his first feature, and can’t wait to see what the writing future has in store!

Want to see what else Ammar has available? Reach out to Ammar via realxwriter “AT” gmail.

WWJD
A scientist transports the Son of God to present day, only to find an inconvenient truth.

Life is full of quandaries and dilemmas. Whenever I am faced with an impossible situation or decision, I remember the advice my Mother gave me as a child. She simply said, “What would Jesus do?”

Sound advice, indeed. Yet, totally worthless.

“Mom, I have two girls who want to go to prom with me, and I don’t want to hurt either of them.” “David,” my Mom would pause for dramatic effect, “What would Jesus do?”

Hmm. Well, being that Jesus was celibate, and Nazareth High didn’t have a prom committee back in 18 A.D., I could only speculate that since he was God – and God is omnipresent – Jesus could take both girls to the prom like a bad episode of Three’s Company.

J.E. Clarke’s short script WWJD ponders a similar question.

Judah Benjamin is a brilliant scientist who heads the Chrono Biogenesis Project. In short, he can transport historical figures to the present day.

Cool job.

Yohannan Wassof is a language professor who specializes in languages of ancient cultures. A man of esoteric knowledge, hired by Judah to translate for his project.

Yohannan witnesses the impossible in Judah’s top secret lab.

Judah’s teleportation machine scans the Shroud of Turin and lights up the room with more lasers than a Pink Floyd laser show. And eventually “rebuilds” a human body; layer by layer, right before his eyes.

Could this be the Son of God in the flesh?

The “test subject” rises from the table and communicates with Yohannan, who is stunned by what he hears.

WWJD is intelligent SF (with a touch of dark humor) which asks the question: what should you do with information that would change the world?

And, what would Jesus do?

Directors who aren’t afraid of mixing science with religion should certainly experiment with this thought-provoking script.

Pages: 7

Budget: Moderate to Expensive depending on the level of FX. A laboratory with some realistic machinery and lasers. Though CGI and post effects could do the trick.

About the Reviewer: David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No. 2 pencil. His short scripts have been featured on MoviePoet.com, Simplyscripts, and this here one. Currently, Dave is writing this review, but plans to write feature films in the near future and take Hollywood by storm. Well, not really storm – more like a sprinkle. He lives in the comatose town of Schuylkill Haven, PA where he is a proud grandfather, a father of two, and a husband of one.

About the writer J.E. Clarke: Known for her unique characters and plots, J.E. Clarke has placed QF and SF for feature lengths in Page, and has two feature length films optioned for 2016/2017: limited location horror “Containment.” and SF feature “Stream of Consciousness.” More of Ms. Clarke’s work can be read at http://www.philclarkejr.com/jec.html. Ms. Clarke can be reached directly at janetgoodman “at” yahoo.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Red Light Indicates Doors Are Secure
A man discovers his fears could be a blessing when a night cab ride goes horribly wrong.

For many metropolitan workers, their daily commute is damned from the moment they walk out the door.

Overcrowded buses and delayed subway trains are daily demons one can’t escape. Mundane monsters which delight in tormenting travelers – making their day Hell from the start.

But getting a comfortable taxi ride isn’t all that bad – right?

Not if you’re Gareth, the protagonist in Anthony Cawood’s “Red Light Indicates Doors Are Secured.” Upper-middle class and entitled, Gareth’s arrogant – in some ways. But it just takes a small red light to extinguish all that confidence in a puff of smoke.

You see, Gareth suffers from Cleithrophobia – the fear of being locked in. And when his cab starts rolling, the doors lock. A red light indicates the doors are secured, and Gareth’s phobia kicks in – fast.

Cruising along dark streets, Gareth’s cab starts and stops at every traffic light, lengthening the trip and causing yet more concern. And Gareth’s anxieties certainly aren’t helped by unexpected hazards – like idiots who try to reach into the moving car. Or stand clueless in the road.

There’s something not quite right about these “idiots”. Maybe they’re all drunk and celebrating. Or perhaps it’s something more. A danger that’ll make Gareth feel relieved that he’s locked in.

Unless things get even worse…

Pages: 8

Budget: Moderate. Just rent a cab for the day. And a few extras as well….!

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: I’m an award winning screenwriter from the UK with over 15 scripts produced, optioned and/or purchased. Outside of my screenwriting career, I’m also a published short story writer and movie reviewer. Links to my films and details of my scripts can be found at http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. 

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Our Time Deserves a Love Song
An aging musician relives his first love when someone asks what inspired him to write a particular love song.

Fact: The worlds oldest song, an Ancient Egyptian melody in 1400BC, was a love song; a tribute from a man to his wife.

And judging by the current charts, the magic of love has and continues to perennially create thousands of spellbinding sounds for our ears to enjoy, many based on personal experiences of the artist.

Our Time Deserves A Love Song delves into the backstory of “Love Song”, an unreleased track by acoustic legend Adam Stern. Asked by a superfan on a chat-show TV interview about the origins of the tune, we’re whisked back over 3 decades to his teenage years in coastal South Africa.

At first, there’s not even a note of love in the sea air. His parents are divorced, and his middle-aged Dad’s driving him to his former other half. Also in the car is Father’s new girl, a beauty half his age. Of course, Adam’s parents end up relishing the chance to insult each other when they arrive.

But adults aren’t the only ones insulting one another – Adam’s non-conforming music taste and fashion sense sees him ostracized by the local cool kids.

Yet it’s at this point when the first verse begins:

GIRL (O.S.)
Don’t sweat them retahds.

Sure, it ain’t the most romantic sentence, but this girl, Mary, turns out to be perfectly in tune with Adam.

As they bond through their love of music and having family problems, it’s clear these two go together like guitar and drum, complimenting one another perfectly.

Sadly, as with all good songs, this one ends suddenly and far too soon. So Adam does the only thing he can do: compose a tribute to this brief romance that’s so beautiful the audience cannot help but applaud loudly when he performs it.

And if you show this film at festivals, real life audiences will have a similar reaction!

Pages: 12

Budget: Moderate. Though, get a good tune for this one!

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: An award winning writer AND photographer, Marnie Mitchell Lister’s website is available at http://brainfluffs.com/. Marnie’s had multiple shorts produced and placed Semi-final with her features in BlueCat.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Dick Jokes
A stand up comedian discusses the male sex and their urges,
whilst going through a very personal journey.

Who wants to hear a dick joke? Well, nobody in the aptly named script Dick Jokes, by Cameron Grey.

But settle into your seats, folks. You’re going to hear an earful anyway.

As the script opens, standup comedian Redmond is just warming up his routine. Standing on stage at a Baltimore comedy club, he opens well-enough – gets a few laughs and dodges one heckler with ease.

But then Redmond runs into trouble. And one particular line falls flat: “I’ve come all the way from NYC to talk to you about dicks.”

Record scratch.

One female audience member gets up to leave. Redmond stops her, begging her to hear the joke before judging. Her response: he has two minutes to make her laugh or she’s gone. Unwilling to fold, Redmond accepts the challenge and begins telling his tale.

As Redmond digs deeper into his “bit”, we cut to flashbacks of Redmond’s life offstage. What led him to the comedy club tonight – and why is he obsessed about… well, Dicks?

Funny and smart, with a surprisingly grown-up message, Dick Jokes will have you in tears, both from laughter and being genuinely touched. (No, not that kind of touched, perverts!)

Trust us, any script that blends comedic timing with real emotion is special. Especially when dick jokes is the focus!

Believe it or not, this one’s safe for work. And great for festivals, as well!

Pages: 10

Budget: Low to medium. A few actors, several settings and a few costume changes, but if you know of a community theatre nearby, you should have everything you need to tell your own dick joke that’ll slay them in the aisles.

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts@gmail.com and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

About the writer: I’m a Scottish/Australian writer. Despite being in proud possession of an Ancient Studies degree, somehow I’ve ended up working in architecture, largely doing3d visualisation and project coordination. Not sure how that happened but it pays the bills!

I initially took to writing scripts as some kind of therapy, a release from the pressures of the construction industry and family life. Now I’ve got into screen writing, work and family life is a breeze but looking for the next idea is a stress. Life’s a bit odd…

My first efforts were in drama, but to my surprise comedy seems to be clicking for myself. Interested in Dick Jokes? (And who isn’t?) Then contact me at cammygray1983 “AT” gmail.com

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SIMPLYSCRIPTS.COM 

OR THE BLOG VERSION OF STS HERE.

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. 

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.