Cracks – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Cracks

A dedicated psychiatrist attempts to help a troubled young man who believes he is dead.

What’s real, and what’s illusion? That question’s made for some freaky-a$$ (and lucrative) films over the years. Jacob’s Ladder. Magic. Donny Darko. Fight Club. Bend reality in interesting ways, and you’ll have audiences eating out of your hand. After all, when you can’t even trust your own senses, things can get… interesting.

Take poor Johnny, for instance. Shiftless, twenty-something and confused. He’s been seeing a shrink recently. A total of six visits when the script opens.

His problem? Well, his memory’s not so good anymore. But there IS one other teeny tiny detail. Johnny thinks he’s dead.

Fortunately, there’s a convenient solution in Johnny’s twisted world. Don’t look anyone in the eye, and everything will be okay.

But that damned doctor won’t stop asking questions. And Johnny’s starting to remember – dark and bloody flashes of things.

What’s real and what’s a trick of the mind? You’ll never know ‘til you head down the rabbit hole. But warning’s are in order here: once you do, it’s real hard to stop falling….

Deceptively simple, Cracks is one of those shorts that builds tension as it goes. It’s like hiding your face behind your hands at a scary movie. ‘Cause you gotta peek. Sometime.

About the writer: I’ve been writing for about five years now. I always loved it but  managed to get constantly side-tracked by silly things like: finding a real job, getting married, having kids, a mortgage… I finally decided to stop making excuses (not completely) and write “for real”. I’ve made it to the quarter-finals of the Nicholls Fellowship, the semi-finals of the Screencraft Fellowship and the finals of the Industry Insider competition featuring Sheldon Turner. I’m still pretty wet behind the ears, but for the first time in a long time, I actually refer to myself  as a writer. I can always be reached at kostak “AT” kostak.com

Pages: 10

Budget: Minor. Two main characters, and a room (mostly you just see the floor.) Some effects will be needed for the flashback scenes, but can be tweaked in post.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved.

The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

The Diner – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

The Diner
Memories Matter. As do the bonds of love…

“Age is but a number”.

Banal as this saying may be, it’s true in many ways. No matter one’s age, human norms like memories and romance never fade… until the very end.

David M. Troop’s short The Diner offers heart-warming proof of this, as we bear witness to the wedding anniversary of two 75-year-olds, Ellen and Joseph.

They must’ve had a myriad of memorable moments together. But tonight, their celebration location is a humble diner, easily dismissed by anyone.

But to our geriatric duo, it’s unforgettable. Because this is where, over half a century ago, their love began to blossom.

And it also creates Ellie’s anniversary present to Joseph: a chance to remember where it all began before age distorts and deletes reality.

And Joseph uses the opportunity given to him wisely: he doesn’t just remind himself of their decades-old beginnings, he recreates them with Ellen, his life-long love.

Perfectly. Resulting in some odd looks from the diner staff. But there won’t be any odd looks from any audience to this microbudget movie – just praise.

Because like the diner Ellen and Joseph visit, The Diner is simple, yet nostalgically beautiful.

And truly impossible to forget.

Pages: 5

Budget: Micro. A diner and some wonderful actors is all you need.

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: David M Troop has been writing since he could hold a No. 2 pencil. His short scripts have been featured on MoviePoet.com, Simplyscripts, at https://www.scriptrevolution.com/profiles/david-troop, and on this here one. Currently, Dave is writing this review, but plans to write feature films in the near future and take Hollywood by storm. Well, not really storm – more like a sprinkle. He lives in the comatose town of Schuylkill Haven, PA where he is a proud grandfather, a father of two, and a husband of one.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Congratulations to James Barron – Disposal Problems Optioned!!

Wow – when a great script meets a terrific Director…  sparks and magic simply fly!

Please join STS in congratulating the heck out of James Barron for his option of Disposal Problems to Director Paul Thompson.  Here’s just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Paul…

*****

Since 2004, Paul has directed several short films, including Where the Wild Things Go, Doe and Quarantine, and music videos for Canadian artists including “Charge!!” for Charge of the Light Brigade, and “Let’s be Friends” for hip-hop artist Infinite. Commercials he’s produced have aired nationally. In addition to his creative projects, Paul is well known as one of the leading digital and HD technicians in Toronto’s feature film industry with credits ranging from indies such as Hedwig and the Angry Inch to Resident Evil: Afterlife 3D and Guillermo Del Toro’s Pacific Rim. Recently his short film “Quarantine” screened at the Mississauga Independent Film Festival in Ontario, the Zero Film Festival in Toronto, and the HyArt Film Festival at the historic HyArt Cinema in Wyoming. Paul’s pilot script for the zombie television series “Grave New World,” co-written with Luke Sneyd, won first place in the Page International Screenwriting Awards contest in 2006, as well as prizes from the Slamdance Teleplay Contest and the Cloud Creek People’s Pilot Competition. And his IMDB is available here: http://www.imdb.com/name/ nm0860582/

*****

Then there’s James himself, of course!  If Paul Thompson wants a piece of him – maybe you better check out James, too. Soon…

Prolific and versatile, James Barron can be reached at jbarron021 “AT” gmail.  His personal website is accessible at http://www.jbarronscripts.com.  And even more can be read via his page at Script Revolution, at this URL: https://www.scriptrevolution.com/profiles/james-barron

 

 

Pinnochio: A Nose for the Flesh – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

Pinocchio: A Nose for Flesh
Pinocchio is back. But this time he’s bad, really bad.

Honesty. Hard work. Achieving one’s deepest dreams.

In most people’s childhood memories, Pinocchio is a comforting tale about how Bad can be turned to Good. How a person may reach their goals if they keep their nose to the grindstone and do right by others in their world. Disney’s 1940 variation of the 19th century Italian fairy tale definitely presented a feel-good version, with Pinocchio’s character arc echoing hope for individual success in post-depression USA.

But James Barron’s Pinocchio: A Nose for Flesh offers up a very different version of the human wannabe and his progenitor, Geppetto. Set in a rural Italian home in the late nineteenth century, this variant is a story of religious fanaticism, unequal gender roles, infantile male rages, and terrifying violence.

The story begins as many of us probably remember. Geppetto creates a wooden figure that he imbues with life and calls his son. Pinocchio begins his life good, polite, and grateful for the opportunity to embrace Geppetto’s family as his own.

As for the old man himself – he’s convinced his creation is divine, a gift from God. But his daughters fear otherwise, and beg their father to consult a priest.

Geppetto ignores his daughters’ pleas, and soon loses interest in his new work. He’s repulsed by the sight of Pinocchio’s growing nose, and irritated by the boy’s polite insistence that he receive the attentions that any real boy deserves:

PINOCCHIO
Father, have I offended thee—

GEPPETTO
(turns to Elisa)
Make it stop speaking to me.

Pinocchio practically vibrates with shame and anger.

PINOCCHIO
I… don’t understand.

GEPPETTO
Cast your glance elsewhere, beast!

When sent from the cottage to collect firewood, Pinocchio’s short-lived happiness rapidly transforms into something much more sinister. He’s determined to return to Geppetto as the real boy that his maker once envisioned. No matter what it takes.

But, if Pinocchio’s petulance persists, he could destroy the very fabric of the life he so craves.

If you’re looking for a very dark rendition of this beloved tale…one where “happily ever after” is not an option, look no further than this work. Pinocchio: A Nose for Flesh is your dark and twisted cup of tea!

Number of pages: 11

Budget: Moderate.

About the reviewer: Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing. She may be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail.

About the writer: James Barron excels in comedy writing. Every so often the horror/thriller muse hits him–and when it does, watch out for that punch! His work is frequently highlighted on Shooting the Shorts. Mr. Barron can be reached at: https://www.scriptrevolution.com/profiles/james-barron/contact

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Calling All Cars… er, Potential Showcasers (Reviewers Needed!)

Here ye, here ye!

As an added benefit to STS’s recent partnership with Script Revolution, we’re officially on the lookout for some great STS Showcase reviewers… to be featured on both the STS Blog and the SR sites.

Here’s the Good, The Not-At-All-Bad, and the Very-Definitely-Not Ugly:

Who’s Needed: Reviewers – both new or veteran – who are enthused at the prospect of reading honestly good scripts, and putting together compelling reviews to help them get picked up and produced. (And coordinating with STS Editor in Chief J.E. Clarke to make sure that review is the absolute best it can be.)

What’s Needed: People who have a talent for writing polished, succinct showcases that grab potential readers by the, um, balls. Or get their attention in some other way. Reviewers who can take the essence of a script and boil it down into a summary that makes for an absolute, no-question must-read.

The Formula (no, we’re not talking Blake Snyder style here): Speaking of balls… here’s the nuts and bolts of what’s involved: During our exciting, twisty-turny three year run (thus far), we at STS have found that GOOD reviews all follow a common scriptwriting Three Act Structure. Thank you very muchly Mr. God-of-Screewriting Syd Field….

Act 1: Some sort of “hook” about the story, premise and/or characters that entices a reader to keep… well… reading on.

Act 2: A summary of the juicy and essential aspects of the script that make it truly stand out. Kind of like a teaser trailer. But with no spoilers, please!

Act 3: The sales pitch – inform the reader WHY it’s crucial they read this script, not to mention option and produce it post haste!

No – we don’t require you to love every aspect of a script – just that you honestly consider it worthy of prime time. And be prepared to dynamically tell the world exactly WHY.

The “Good: Every STS reviewer gets a by-line alongside the showcases they produce… in other words, exposure of their own.

The Not-At-All-Bad: While Reviewers are unpaid (hey, most of us have day jobs, folks!), here’s an unexpected but very welcome bonus. Keep reviewing, and you’ll quickly find the repeated act of reviewing polishes your own screenwriting skills. More quickly than you could expect, you’ll become better at distilling stories to their true essence… learning what works, what doesn’t.

The-Very-Definitely-Not Ugly: As a result of helping other writers “sell” their scripts, you’ll improve your own elevator pitch, as well!

Interested? We’re pretty sure you are.

If so, please head on over to Script Revolution, sign up as a free member and reach out to Founder/Administrator CJ Walley for possible reviewer status.

If you’ve got that reviewer touch – we sincerely hope you will. See you there!

Too Short the Peace – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

Too Short the Peace
Sandeep – a Sikh soldier who fought for England in WW1 – recalls events that took place in 1914 and the friend he made in a German soldier.

War. It ruins so much, with so little gained. War destroys lives, marriages, hearts, and friendships en masse. And what does war create? Graveyards. And little else.

But on Christmas 1914, “war” on the Western Front surprisingly destroyed nothing, created friendships, and healed hearts. For a far-too-brief span of time, British and German soldiers exchanged souvenirs, prisoners, and even kicked a ball about in No Man’s Land.

As the title suggests, the peace sadly didn’t last. But as Too Short the Peace itself suggests, memories of what happened lingered on.

Focusing on two soldiers on opposite sides, Sandeep (a Sikh fighting for the British) and Jurgen (a German), we see the men bond over candles, candy and Christmas during the temporary truce.

A candle that – over 70 years later – still sits in Sandeep’s living room. But it’s not the only souvenir he owns. He’s got Jurgen’s jacket too. And a Victoria Cross.

Why? Well, despite growing so close they share cherished photographs, Christmas is now well and truly over – the guns and shells silenced no longer.

But before Boxing Day is out, Sandeep and Jurgen will have one more encounter – on opposite sides. A moment that will strengthen their friendship. And an encounter that makes Sandeep regret it was their last.

Or was it? 71 years later, will these two reunite – and reminisce?

A short that doesn’t glorify war, but instead glorifies the universal goodness present in ALL humans, Too Short the Peace arguably deserves to be renamed Too Short the Script.

Trust us… it’s THAT good!

Pages: 12

Budget: Mid-range. Judicious, stylish editing can make the costs moderate for this. But please don’t skimp where it counts!

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer, Miletha Thomas: Milethia hails from England and works as a communication support worker/teaching assistant. She is an active writer, often to be found writing beyond the ‘witching hour’, and has placed in semi-finalist and finalist stages of competitions.

In 2011 she was the joint winner of the London Screenwriters Festival – “Four Nights in August” – competition and was able to experience the different approaches/interpretations that filmmakers took when filming the short script. Anil Rao’s version of the script won the best film – https://vimeo.com/30941061. Her short script ‘Bucket’ is currently in post-production with Penn Productions.

Presently, Milethia is one of 50 writers selected as winners of Create50’s ‘The Impact’ – http://theimpact.create50.com/theimpact – the filming stage of which will shortly open. This is an opportunity for filmmakers to be involved in creating a feature film. As well as writing screenplays, she writes plays – highly commended in the Trinity College playwriting competition in 2014 and shortlisted in Chesil Theatre’s David Bowie inspired short play competition 2016.

When not writing, she likes to tap dance and Lindy Hop.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

Ugly Beautiful – Short Script Review (Available for Production!)

UGLY BEAUTIFUL
A tormented schoolgirl makes the transformation from ugly outcast to head-turning beauty using unorthodox methods.

Beauty is only skin deep…

While that may be of comfort to some, it’s scant consolation to the antagonists of ‘Ugly Beautiful’, Warren Duncan’s twisted take on the fairytale classic The Ugly Duckling.

First off – let’s meet Page:

A twenty-something beauty turning heads with a risk of whiplash as she strides through the city, soaking up attention every step she takes. This is Page’s moment. It’s what she’s been waiting for her whole life. In her mind, this is the way it was supposed to be. Just like all pretty girls deserve…

But it wasn’t always like this. For once there was a troubled teen, subjected to a ritual of daily abuse at the hands of three high-school bullies who convinced Page she was too ugly to ever find love. It’s the kind of torment that stays with a kid, ingraining itself deep in the psyche; consuming the soul as it grows into a singular desire for perfection at any cost.

Cut to ten years later, when our trio of high-school haters are living it up in the suburban bubble. The wine flows freely. The cosmetic surgeon is on speed-dial. And Porky Page (as they nicknamed her) is now a distant memory.

But when the lights suddenly go out on one of their weekly soirees, the “mean girls” soon discover not all ducklings become beautiful swans. Some become a different creature altogether.

They told her she’d never be loved for who she was. But if Page can’t find comfort in her own skin…

…maybe someone else’s will have to do.

Warren Duncan’s modern take on the Hans Christian Andersen classic gives us a dark tale of a tormented teenager with consequences that stretch beyond childhood. Fast paced and grittily scribed, Ugly Beautiful pulls you into Page’s world to experience her suffering – then turns the tables in an unflinchingly macabre payoff. Fans of low budget slashers would do well to check this out.

Pages: 12

Budget: A handful of characters and locations – nothing fancy; home interiors and several outdoor: street/woodland. Some gore on this one so be prepared to get creative with the make-up and fake blood.

About the Reviewer: Steve Miles started writing scripts around five years ago after realizing that his social life was vastly overrated. He enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit – from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums.

About the Writer: I am an aspiring screenwriter from Australia. Two of my shorts have been produced and I have another one in pre production. I typically enjoy writing horror, thriller, and drama scripts. Please feel free to contact me at warren_duncan “AT” hotmail!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.