A Line in the Sand – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

A Line in the Sand

Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them, humanity cannot survive. – The Dalai Lama

“A Line in the Sand,” a short screenplay by award-winning screenwriter (and graphic novelist) Tim Westland, describes a gritty dystopian future, a civilization on the edge, at a crossroads — a dramatic, high-tension moment that could either rescue mankind from itself or cause our society to unravel completely.

The story takes place in 2037, and like all the best tales of futuristic dystopias (e.g. Blade Runner, The Matrix, etc.), “A Line in the Sand” is a masterful blend of two things: First, it’s a rockin’ good sci-fi story (complete with all the trimmings — UltraMarines, exo-suits, and high-tech weaponry) with a somber gloominess about it. This is one possible future that we hope never comes to pass. And secondly — it’s totally plausible. It could come to pass. “A Line in the Sand” pits religious fanaticism against nuclear madness. It’s like a headline from today’s news — projected twenty years into the future. Scary, to say the least.

There’s a third thing that ramps up the emotional impact of this script — more than anything else it’s a story about people. Specifically two people: two men, both warriors, but radically different nonetheless. One is a military man trying to save the world; the other a fanatical religious terrorist trying to tear it to shreds.

They meet on a California beach at sunset after the terrorist group has destroyed a nuclear reactor. It’s a horrific scene. As UltraMarine John Hawkins says, it’s “going to stain this coastline for the next ten thousand years.” While he combs through the rubble on the beach, he stumbles upon a lone survivor, one of the terrorists. The man is badly injured, “covered with festering radiation sores.” Hawkins could kill him right then and there. Why not? An eye for an eye and all that. Among the horror and the wreckage, what’s one more death?

But the damage is already done; one more death won’t make things right. And Hawkins is a compassionate man. So when the injured terrorist asks for a favor – the chance to enjoy one last sunset – Hawkins carries him to the beach and props him up against a rock at the water’s edge. As they listen to the waves crash against the shoreline and watch the sun touch the horizon, the two men share philosophies: one contemplating a grim future, the other with not much future left.

But which is which? And, the terrorist’s storyline isn’t quite yet. It turns out there’s still some life radiating within him.

Is the Dalai Lama right? Without compassion can humanity survive?

Maybe Hawkins should have killed him when he had the chance….

Pages: 6

Budget: Moderate-to-high. Some futuristic scene setting may be required, but with some creativity (or some CGI), they could be simulated.

About the writer: The co-writer of the acclaimed graphic novel Chasing the Dead, Tim Westland received first place for Balls Out in the NNYM 15 page contest. An outstanding writer with an eye for the details, his IMDB page can be found here.

Want to see yet more of Tim’s work?  Wander over to his page on at ScriptRevolution here!  https://www.scriptrevolution.com/profiles/tim-westland

About the reviewer: Helen Magellan (a pseudonym) is a successful screenwriter with several produced short scripts under her belt.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Quorum – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Quorum

A small town sheriff gets the drop on uninvited visitors from out of town – and Big Government’s meddling.

Big Government. Sticking its massive horns into State and Local County rights. It’s a real inflammatory issue these days, served up with a rainbow of different flavors. Religious displays. Gun ownership. Environmental and Social concerns, clashing against property rights. Topics such as these get folks all hot and bothered – regardless of which side of the issue one lands on. But one thing we can all agree. Watching David get the best of Goliath – that’s a mighty satisfying feeling. No matter what political pin shines on your lapel.

Take Jack Burns – County Sheriff of an unnamed locality, smack dab in the middle of USA Anywhere. As is normal in such small districts, Jack wears several hats. For instance, Chairperson of the County Board of Supervisors – an assembly just about to meet. And this time, they’ve got guests. Namely, Carl Welsh – EPA. And Randall Eckhard, attorney. The two have breezed in from out of town, to ensure certain laws get enforced. It’s quite a laundry list they hold in their hands. Local Farmer Reed, accused of draining ecologically delicate swamp land. Then there’s the removal of religious symbols from town property. The Cross – displayed up until recently in court. And then there’s that Navity Scene

Both are conspicuously absent when the Feds arrive. Sheriff Jack’s in full compliance… or is he? Or do the townsfolk have something up their sleeve? Something that’ll turn Big Government’s demands on its head. And Goliath to his knees?

Humorous and definitely controversial, Quorum is bound to get your audience chattering. It’s a satiric piece with all the right beats. Mr. Mark Twain would be very proud.

About the writer, Fred Perry: Fred Perry has worked as a screenwriter in Europe, Mexico and the U.S., co-authoring six feature films for Omega Entertainment, Athens, Greece, as well as collaborating on multiple projects with Alfonso Arau (director of LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE and A WALK IN THE CLOUDS).

Fred’s screenplays have won numerous awards. His dark comedy short, FIVE DAYS IN CALCUTTA, won the Grand Prize in the 2014 Palm Street Films Screenplay Competition (shorts category), 1st Place at the 2014 Richmond International Film Festival (comedy screenplay genre), 1st Place, 2013 Fresh Voices Screenplay Competition (shorts), the Grand Prize, 2014 American Movie Awards (shorts), 1st, 2013 DC Shorts Film Festival and Screenplay Competition, 1st, 82nd (2013) Annual Writer’s Digest Writing Competition (subsequently published), the Gold Prize in the 2013 Hollywood Screenplay Competition (shorts), and 1st in the 2012 PAGE International Screenplay Awards (shorts). The script will shoot this January, directed by Dawn Fields of Palm Street Films.

His feature sci-fi script, CROSSINGS won the Grand Jury Award for Best Feature Screenplay at the 2014 Richmond International Film Festival, 1st at the 2014 Omaha Film Festival, 1st in the 9th annual Filmmakers International Screenplay Competition, 1st in the 2013 Holiday Screenplay Competition, and was a semifinalist in the 2013 Academy Nicholl Fellowships.

He is a published playwright, his two-act, THE ASCENSION OF TWYLA POTTS, winning the 2013 London Film Festival (stage play category), and earning the Special Marquee Award at this year’s American Film Awards. Fred has also written and directed plays at the Colony Theatre in Los Angeles and the Carrollwood Players Theatre in Tampa Bay.

Pages: 11

Budget: Very low. One small “courthouse” and you’re fine.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

By the Power Vested in Me – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

By the Power Vested in Me

Will a power outage serve as a sign that a wedding shouldn’t happen?

Weddings. They’re very nervous affairs – even under the best conditions. Should I? Shouldn’t I? Am I making the biggest mistake of my life? And what of that ex I still carry a smoldering torch for… Will I regret this in the morning light?

Such questions flow through a lot of guy’s minds, on the morning of their wedding day.

And so it is with Nate when he awakes. 25 and engaged to Christina. Yet he still has feelings for his ex-girlfriend, Audry. As the script opens, Nate’s family busies themselves in the backyard barn – arranging flowers for the ceremony. A thunderstorm rages overhead; a mirror to Nate’s conflicted feelings.

…which is when the lights cut out. It’s a downed powerline – killing the electricity. Is it a Harbinger of Doom: God’s way of saying “no way?”.

The crisis throws Nate’s turmoil into emergency overdrive. He races (without tuxedo) to his truck, and peels out of the driveway. Where is he heading? To his true love, Audry? Or perhaps Interstate 90, and beyond.

The DJ and guests arrive. The wedding hour nears. Nate and Christina’s parents scramble to do their best without power… but secretly worry if Nate will arrive. For storms can ruin many things. Including marriages, before they’re born…

Written by professional storyteller Rick Hansberry, Power is a marvelous slice of life drama. A double entendre title with ticking clock urgency, this is one script with lots of charm.

About the writer: Rick Hansberry has written/produced several short films, including the SAG Foundation award-winning “Branches.” He teaches screenwriting seminars and workshops in the Central Pennsylvania area and is presently available for hire for new story ideas, rewrites and adaptations. He can be reached at djrickhansberry – AT – msn, (cell phone 717-682-8618) and IMDB credits available here.

Pages: 7

Budget: Medium. A few settings, and a storm. But nothing that can’t be augmented with post.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM!

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

 

 

Ding – Short Script Review (Available for Production!!)

Ding
A proud elevator operator fights to protect those in his charge from the sinister presence lurking on floor 13. Unless that is, they opt for the stairs…

What work to tackle first. Where to eat lunch. Whether to take the stairs or the elevator. All decisions that millions of weary office workers make daily.

Apart from in Ding, where everyone takes the elevator. Why? Because of Shadwell – the proudest lift operator in America. With a spotless uniform and a cheerful demeanour (once you pay him), there seems to be no reason to take the stairs.

Unless your destination is floor 13 – Shadwell won’t stop at that floor. And every time the elevator reaches this unlucky floor, he’s forced to perform some weird acrobatics to keep the lift moving.

Until a frustrated client stops the lift at that very floor. Determined to take the stairs.

Shadwell’s warnings can’t stop him. But what Shadwell’s been “protecting” his clients from can…

What really does lie on the unlucky floor? And why is Shadwell so adamant about avoiding the stairs? Only by taking the ride of a lifetime and experiencing the ups and downs of this thrilling script will these questions be answered!

Pages: 9

Budget: Relatively low. Of course, you’ll need an elevator… obviously!

About the reviewer: Hamish Porter is a writer who, if he was granted one wish, would ask for the skill of being able to write dialogue like Tarantino. Or maybe the ability to teleport. Nah, that’s nothing compared to the former. A lover of philosophy, he’s working on several shorts and a sporting comedy that can only be described as “quintessentially British”. If you want to contact him, he can be emailed: hamishdonaldp “AT” gmail.com. If you’d like to contact him and be subjected to incoherent ramblings, follow him on Twitter @HamishP95.

About the writer: Steve Miles started writing scripts around five years ago after realizing that his social life was vastly overrated. He enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit – from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums.

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

So Cal Gun Girls – Short Script Review

So Cal Gun Girls

After buying drugs and debating the commercialization of cannabis in California, two female gang members stumble straight into a robber who’s killed their beloved dealer.

Remember when Tarantino first exploded on the scene?  No, we don’t mean Inglourious Basterds, or Django, either. No, we’re talkin’ real classics: Pulp Fiction level quality. Quirky dialog that blew your mind.  Gritty characters that popped right off the screen.  Cinematic mainline stuff that left you begging for more.

Well, imagine fresh and shiny QT content – with a 180 gender twist.  Characters like Sam Jackson and Travolta – but packin’ tampons along with 45s.  That’s So Cal Gun Girls in a nutshell.  And it’s a bundle of criminal fun.

Meet Maddy and Lila – two mid-level grass dealers in CA.  For years, their distributor’s been the singular Suzanne Wu (her stoic father rolling joints by her side.)  The girls make a living – such as it is – but recently Maddy’s been dreaming of something… more.  Especially with legalization encroaching on their territory. Can they really compete with Walmart? Or is it time to expand a bit? Madam Wu’s pushing the latest and greatest product – meth (though not Walter White trademark blue.)  The girls refuse the offer, and head outside to debate microeconomics… and their next business steps.

But things are about to get complicated. Because a hostile takeover’s in the works.  One that’ll affect the girl’s market. And perhaps their lives.

Yep, it’s Reservoir Dogs meets Bridesmaids (or The Heat, if you’re so inclined.) But whatever you call it, So Cal Gun Girls is real good sh*t (and potentially expandable to feature length).  Perfect for directors with a criminal mind.

About the writer, C.J. Walley: I began writing in 2012 and I’m pleased to say it’s been very exciting so far. I have been fortunate enough to have a short produced by a director in London and Amazon Studios have spotlighted one of my features as a notable project. My scripts place within the top 10% of various major screenwriting competitions and, as I continue to write specs, I am remotely collaborating with a producer in LA on a comedy series, working with a director in New Orleans on a thriller, and blogging for Stage 32. I’m here to do two things, work hard and make friends. My writing has a down and dirty tone, deep emotion, gritty action, wry humor, and features strong female leads. If you’re an aspiring filmmaker, then I’d love to join forces with you whatever the scale, do not hesitate to reach out and drop me a line. (CJ “AT” CJwalley DOT COM; http://www.cjwalley.com)

Pages: 8

Budget: Mid range.  You want great actresses, of course.  And awesome cinematography wouldn’t hurt, either.

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Left in the Dark – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

“Left in the Dark”

A traumatic incident from his past clouds a father’s time with his daughter.

Write an original story, breathe life into unique characters, add some color, and — voilá — a compelling story. Writers have it so easy!

If only it were really that simple… Injecting emotion and heart into characters and the story may be a writer’s toughest challenge.

The heart of “Left in the Dark” manifests itself in four-year-old Brianna, “cute is an understatement,” who convinces her father, Zach, to join her tea party. Unbeknownst to Brianna, the tea party’s dark location — a tent of strategically-arranged beach towels in her closet — resurrects in Zach a distressful childhood experience. While he struggles with on-setting panic, a sympathetic Brianna realizes she has the perfect panacea.

The sweet father-daughter relationship in LITD will tug at your heart. For this loving father, his adoring daughter is just the right prescription… As it will be for any director looking for a solid character piece with soul.

So, act quickly. You won’t want to miss out on any of the “ahhh” moments! And neither will your audience!

About the writer: Rick Hansberry has written/produced several short films, including the SAG Foundation award-winning “Branches.” His first feature is set to be released in the summer of 2014. Trailer available here . He teaches screenwriting seminars and workshops in the Central Pennsylvania area and is presently available for hire for new story ideas, rewrites and adaptations. He can be reached at djrickhansberry – AT – msn, (cell phone 717-682-8618) and IMDB credits available here.

Page Count: 5

Budget: Low. A house interior, and a small cast. Secure a tea set, BYOBT (bring-your-own-beach-towels), and don’t forget to invite Jasmine and Ariel!

About the guest reviewer for “Left in the Dark”: California uber reader/reviewer KP Mackie is working hard on another animated feature. KP’s work is available for viewing at moviepoet.com!

READ THIS SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.

 

Time to Fly – Short Script Review (Available for Production)

Time to Fly

Feeling trapped in her relationship, a girl with a flair for the dramatic finally pushes her easy going boyfriend too far.

There’s nothing like a good drama short. They’re easy to shoot – touch a chord with universal human themes, and give up-and-coming directors the chance to showcase all the stuff that matters: solid acting, directing, cinematography.

When you find a script that does all that, then you’ve found pure film gold, my man. Or digital gold… assuming you use an RED and keep the script in PDF.

Time to Fly is one of those – no matter how you choose to film it. A simple piece, it follows a day in the life of Conor and Ashley, a pair that’s had far too many fights. When we meet the couple, Ashley’s locked herself in the bathroom. And when she does come out, it’s to start packing bags. Which is a shame – because it’s obvious these two once had something real. Exhibit A: their pet birds, Kiki and Aldo… happy in their gilded cage. Ashley stomps away, luggage in tow. Connor isn’t concerned; he’s seen this fit of pique before. But will this time be different? What do the fates have in store – for the lovebirds (or their humans?)

Despite the inherent drama, Time to Fly is written with a wry, gentle sense of humor… highlighting a few eternal truths about relationships. Both those in, and past their prime.

About the writer: An award winning writer AND photographer, Marnie Mitchell Lister’s website is available at http://brainfluffs.com/. Marnie’s had 5 shorts produced (so far) and placed Semi-final with her features in Bluecat.

Pages: 5

Budget: Very low. One house (interior and a little exterior) is all you need. Oh – and two birds. That’s essential for this one!

READ THE SCRIPT HERE – AND DON’T FORGET TO COMMENT!!

FOR YET MORE SCRIPTS AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION:

PLEASE SEARCH SCRIPTREVOLUTION.COM

All screenplays are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. The screenplays may not be used without the expressed written permission of the author.